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Baltazar Automóveis


#62

The 2019 Baltazar Planck

1.0T Tellurium in Lime Lollipop

Baltazar is proud to present the smallest car of the range, named after the smallest size conceivable within the standard model of Physics, a unit of measure named in honour of the man who conceived this limit, Max Planck.

For 2018, the Baltazar Planck has received a facelift, with new head and tail lights and new bumpers outside, while the inside gets updated infotainment options, some new personalisation options and new seat upholstery, aimed towards giving a more upmarket feeling.

The engine range still consists in the 1.0 3-cylinder unit, in two states of tune, a 70 hp NA model and a 95 hp turbocharged one. Drive is sent to the front wheels through either a 5 speed manual gearbox or a 5 speed automated manual.

1.0 Nitrogen in Glacier White

Sales start immediately in Europe, with the Latin America model due for the São Paulo Motorshow in November. The chinese debut will take place in the Shanghai Autoshow, with sales starting in July.

Planck will be produced at the Baltazar factories in Budapest, Hungary; Sorocaba, Brazil; Samut Prakan, Thailand and Hangzhou, China

Available trims - click on the arrows to show details

Planck 1.0 Nitrogen - $7,750 at 10% markup

Technical Details

Chassis

Galvanised steel Monocoque
Bonnet, doors and boot lid made of Aluminium
Front Transverse engine, Front Wheel Drive
5 speed manual gearbox
McPherson struts front suspension, Torsion beam rear

Weight: 894 kg

Engine
Inline 3. 999 cc. naturally aspirated
MPFI
Variable Valve Timing on Admission and Exhaust
95 RON Premium Fuel required
Power: 68.5 hp at 6.400 rpm
Torque:
Redline: 6,900 rpm

Performance figures

0-100: 13.1 s
Top Speed: 158 km/h
50 to 75 mph: 10.6 s
Quarter Mile: 19.15s
Fuel economy: 19.9 km/l combined

Planck 1.0 Nitrogen SCT - $8,500 at 20% markup

Technical Details

Chassis

Galvanised steel Monocoque
Bonnet, doors and boot lid made of Aluminium
Front Transverse engine, Front Wheel Drive
5 speed Single Clutch automated manual gearbox
McPherson struts front suspension, Torsion beam rear

Weight: 896 kg

Engine
Inline 3. 999 cc. naturally aspirated
MPFI
Variable Valve Timing on Admission and Exhaust
95 RON Premium Fuel required
Power: 68.5 hp at 6.400 rpm
Torque:
Redline: 6,900 rpm

Performance figures

0-100: 13.0 s
Top Speed: 158 km/h
50 to 75 mph: 10.6 s
Quarter Mile: 19.02s
Fuel economy: 19.9 km/l combined

Planck 1.0T Nitrogen - $9,670 at 20% markup

Technical Details

Chassis

Galvanised steel Monocoque
Bonnet, doors and boot lid made of Aluminium
Front Transverse engine, Front Wheel Drive
5 speed manual gearbox
McPherson struts front suspension, Torsion beam rear

Weight: 936 kg

Engine
Inline 3. 999 cc. turbocharged
Direct injection
Variable Valve Timing on Admission and Exhaust
95 RON Premium Fuel required
Power: 95 hp at 6.200 rpm
Torque:
Redline: 6,800 rpm

Performance figures

0-100: 9.4 s
Top Speed: 175 km/h
50 to 75 mph: 7.1 s
Quarter Mile: 16.86s
Fuel economy: 23.8 km/l combined

Planck 1.0T Tellurium - $10,995 at 20% markup

Technical Details

Chassis

Galvanised steel Monocoque
Bonnet, doors and boot lid made of Aluminium
Front Transverse engine, Front Wheel Drive
5 speed manual gearbox
McPherson struts front suspension, Torsion beam rear

Weight: 994 kg

Engine
Inline 3. 999 cc. turbocharged
Direct injection
Variable Valve Timing on Admission and Exhaust
95 RON Premium Fuel required
Power: 95 hp at 6.200 rpm
Torque:
Redline: 6,800 rpm

Performance figures

0-100: 10.1 s
Top Speed: 174 km/h
50 to 75 mph: 7.6 s
Quarter Mile: 17.47s
Fuel economy: 23.3 km/l combined

Planck 1.0T Tellurium SCT - $11,995 at 30% markup

Technical Details

Chassis

Galvanised steel Monocoque
Bonnet, doors and boot lid made of Aluminium
Front Transverse engine, Front Wheel Drive
5 speed Single Clutch automated manual gearbox
McPherson struts front suspension, Torsion beam rear

Weight: 997 kg

Engine
Inline 3. 999 cc. turbocharged
Direct injection
Variable Valve Timing on Admission and Exhaust
95 RON Premium Fuel required
Power: 95 hp at 6.200 rpm
Torque:
Redline: 6,800 rpm

Performance figures

0-100: 10.0 s
Top Speed: 174 km/h
50 to 75 mph: 7.4 s
Quarter Mile: 17.34s
Fuel economy: 23.3 km/l combined

1.0 Nitrogen in Glacier White

1.0T Tellurium in Lime Lollipop

#63

Overall design is a bit too simplistic for me. A good city car competitor though :grin:


#64

Sometimes less is more, and that is very much the case with cars that are meant to be simple and affordable. It’s all about getting a cohesive and smart look without over complicating and adding costs.


#65

I like it. It is a bit simple, but most city cars are rather simple. They put the money where it matters most.


#66

The 2019 Baltazar Stardust

Baltazar Stardust 2.0TS Lithium AWD in Midnight Purple (US Spec)

Introduction

Distinctive, yet discreet. Elegant, yet charming. Premium, yet affordable, Baltazar’s award-winning best selling D-segment sedan has received a revamp. In are the lastest tech and engine options, with the new 2.0 turbocharged forming the basis of the engine range.

The new Stardust will seek to allure buyers that are looking for a distinctive model, capable of carrying them long distances in comfort and premium ambience, stepping its foot above normal mainstream models and but below the cost of fully premium options, like a Bonham Chaucer.

Baltazar Stardust 2.0TS Lithium AWD in Pale Blue Metallic (US Spec)

Powertrain

The car can be equipped with a choice of 3 power outputs from 2 engine options, a 1.5 turbocharged inline 4 or a pair of 2.0 turbocharged inline 4 units, with power outputs of 150, 202 and 265 hp respectively. . All options can be paired with either a 6 speed manual gearbox or a 6 speed DCT unit, with power sent to the front wheels. AWD is available as an option on the 2.0 models.

Available powertrain options

  • 1.5 Turbo Inline 4 - 150 hp - 6 speed manual or DCT, FWD only (Europe and Asia only)
  • 2.0 Turbo Inline 4 - 202 hp - 6 speed manual or DCT, FWD, with AWD available in Europe (All Markets)
  • 2.0 Turbo Inline 4 - 265 hp - 6 speed manual or DCT, FWD or AWD (All markets - Exclusively sold in GT trim in Europe and Asia)

Baltazar Stardust 2.0TS Lithium AWD in Pale Blue Metallic (US Spec)

Baltazar Stardust 2.0TS Lithium AWD in Midnight Purple (US Spec)

Baltazar Stardust 2.0TS Lithium AWD in Midnight Purple (US Spec)

Factories

  • Aguascalientes, Mexico (NAFTA, LATAM, West Africa markets)
  • Bedford, UK (European market)
  • Hangzhou, China (Chinese and East Asia markets)
  • Samut Prakan, Thailand (Thailand, South Asia, East and South Africa and Oceania)

Trim levels

Stardust 1.5T Tellurium - $25,175 at 30% markup

Technical Details

Chassis

Light AHS steel Monocoque
Bonnet, doors and boot lid made of Aluminium
Front Transverse engine, Front Wheel Drive
6 speed manual gearbox
McPherson struts front suspension, Multilink rear

Weight: 1520 kg

Engine
Inline 4. 1499 cc. turbocharged
Direct injection
Variable Valve Timing on Admission and Exhaust
95 RON Premium Fuel required
Power: 149 hp at 6,100 rpm
Torque: 217 Nm at 3,800 rpm
Redline: 6,700 rpm

Performance figures

0-100: 9.3 s
Top Speed: 225 km/h
50 to 75 mph: 6.4 s
Quarter Mile: 16.75s
Fuel economy: 19.2 km/l combined

Stardust 2.0T Tellurium - $29,420 at 40% markup

Technical Details

Chassis

Light AHS steel Monocoque
Bonnet, doors and boot lid made of Aluminium
Front Transverse engine, Front Wheel Drive
6 speed DCT gearbox
McPherson struts front suspension, Multilink rear

Weight: 1597 kg

Engine
Inline 4. 1998 cc. turbocharged
Direct injection
Variable Valve Lift and Timing on Admission and Exhaust
95 RON Premium Fuel required
Power: 202 hp at 6,800 rpm
Torque: 271 Nm at 4,400 rpm
Redline: 7,000 rpm

Performance figures

0-100: 7.4 s
Top Speed: 248 km/h
50 to 75 mph: 4.8 s
Quarter Mile: 15.55s
Fuel economy: 17.3 km/l combined

Stardust 2.0TS Lithium AWD - $40,160 at 50% markup

Technical Details

Chassis

Light AHS steel Monocoque
Bonnet, doors and boot lid made of Aluminium
Front Transverse engine, All Wheel Drive 45/55 F/R split
6 speed DCT gearbox
McPherson struts front suspension, Multilink rear

Weight: 1872 kg

Engine
Inline 4. 1998 cc. turbocharged
Direct injection
Variable Valve Lift and Timing on Admission and Exhaust
95 RON Premium Fuel required
Power: 265 hp at 7,700 rpm
Torque: 293 Nm at 5,100 rpm
Redline: 8,200 rpm

Performance figures

0-100: 6.9 s
Top Speed: 259 km/h
50 to 75 mph: 4.6 s
Quarter Mile: 15.04s
Fuel economy: 14.4 km/l combined


#67

Here’s one more car straight from our archives, the

1991 Baltazar Zeppelin

Zeppelin 2.0S in Midnight Purple with Deep Black Roof

Introduced in the 1990 Paris Motorshow, the Baltazar Zeppelin was the brand’s attempt to rejuvenate its image, by introducing a sporty and lightweight sports car. Designed from scratch with a unique steel monocoque, the elegant and smooth bodywork was made from aluminium, enhancing the lightweight theme further.

As the flag-bearers of the small, lightweight sports car, assembly took place in the UK, within the terrain of the Baltazar-Bonham complex in , Worcestershire, in a small assembly line dedicated to this model.

Inside, it was a lesson in minimalism. The interior had creature comforts like a simple, 2-speaker, cassette radio, electric windows and power locks, but aircon was an optional extra. The seats were sportier than in your average Baltazar and finished in a mixture of cloth and velour. In order to keep costs down, however, a lot of the switchgear, instruments and some other trim pieces could be recognised from other models.

Zeppelin 2.0S in Midnight Purple with Deep Black Roof

The suspension was independent all-round, with double wishbones on all four corners. The engine was mounted in the middle, transversely, with the 5-speed gearbox next to it. This configuration allowed the use of some of the engines already found in the rest of the Baltazar range.

Chosen for the mission was a short-stroke version of the Baltazar Large Inline 4 engine, a proven and trusty engine, built in several iterations since 1977. The cast-iron, SOHC, 2-valve per cylinder base perhaps wasn’t the most cutting-edge in engine technologies, but it was heavily reworked by the engineers from Baltazar Racing to deliver two very different flavours.

Zeppelin 2.0S in Midnight Purple with Deep Black Roof

The entry level model, 2.0S, feature a naturally-aspirated version of this engine, designed to provide mid-range pull and good fuel economy, with features like an exclusive coating on the pistons to minimize friction. The resulting output was 140 hp @6,200 rpm and 172 Nm @4,500 rpm. That power was enough to bring the 976 kg car from 0-100 in 7.4s and onto a top speed of 211 km/h.

Despite those good numbers, especially for the era, many felt something was missing and some of the press urged Baltazar to make a faster model.

More to come…


#68

Following up on last time

After the release of the Zeppelin 2.0 in late 1990, the next major european motorshow was Geneva 1991. And in the Baltazar stand, before the press-event, when all the cars were still covered, laid a shape that was obviously a Zeppelin, but a protuberance on the rear deck that resembled some kind of boot spoiler.

Obviously, that turned out to be the

1992 Baltazar Zeppelin Turbo

Zeppelin Turbo Sport in Performance orange

The car did what it said on the tin. It was a turbocharged version of the standard Zeppelin, with the same cast-iron 70s 2.0 inline 4, now with added boost. Enough boost to bring power up to 200 hp, in a car that weighed little over 1000 kg. That power was enough to bring the Zeppelin up to the pace of exotic sports cars, like the Porsche 911 or the Ferrari 348. Acceleration from 0-100 took only 5.6s, and the top speed was a massive 240 km/h;

Zeppelin Turbo Sport in Performance orange

In order to keep all that power in check, all turbos have a mechanical limited slip differential as standard and the suspension was recalibrated and stiffened. However buyers could choose between one of two specifications, L or Sport. L models were designed to retain ride comfort and give a more pliant ride, where as Sport was sharper and more focused.

Inside, there were differences between the two trim levels as well. Sport is more focused, with body-hugging, semi-bucket seats, trimmed in alcantara ,as was the dashboard, with air-con and radio as optional extras. Meanwhile, L models got leather trimmed electric seats, central locking and an electric antenna for the radio, which could be a 6-speaker Pioneer unit, with a 6-disk CD changer, if so specced.

Zeppelin Turbo Sport in Performance orange

24 hour clunker challenge - FINAL RESULTS!
#69

The background of Baltazar Automóveis has always been a little bit sparse, to say the least. Therefore, I decided to expand it. Below, a little bit on how Baltazar was funded, started to expand internationally and its ties with Bonham and Bush.

Lore update

In 1887, in the city of Curitiba, Baltazar Coachworks Limited was founded to produce wagons for horse carriages, with varying degrees of luxury. Due to the high quality nature of the work, the company enjoyed local success, selling carriages to neighbouring states São Paulo and Santa Catarina.

As tramways started to be used in every state capital, the company decided to start to make tram wagons, renaming itself, in 1898, as Baltazar Coach & Wagon Company. The company enjoyed some success in sales across Latin America due to the lower costs when compared with European and American rivals.

In 1938, engineering work on a small car began. Under the project name EP1, short for Experimento Popular 1, the car was designed to cater to the poor Brazilian population, by being simple to build and repair, cheap, reliable and affordable. However, the company didn’t have enough funds to build a factory for the new car.

In 1940, the prototype was shown to the national government, who had devised a policy to encourage the growth of local industry. Impressed by the potential, the company won the blessing of the president Getúlio Vargas. ¾ of the capital of the new company was owned by the government, however 51% of the voting capital remained in private hands. Baltazar Automóveis was founded in May 1st, 1942, in a vast celebration where the fundamental stone for the construction of the factory was laid, in São Bernardo do Campo, São Paulo. Meanwhile, the headquarters of the now named Baltazar Holding Limited remained in Curitiba, Paraná.

By the time the first cars rolled off the line, in November 1947, Vargas was no longer in power and the post-war economic scenario was dire. The car was perfectly suited for recovering Europe and sales began in early 1949. Distribution was handled by Bonham Cars, the British luxury car maker, who was struggling amidst a slow market for luxury vehicles in post war Europe, yet didn’t want to dilute their brand exclusivity by producing cheap cars.

Meanwhile, trams began to be phased out in Brazilian cities, as they started to be seen as slow, uncomfortable and overcrowded, encouraging the development of bus lines, which meant new tram orders were all but non-existent. This, coupled with the surge in the demand for heavy utility vehicles and trucks, caused the announcement of the shutdown of the Coach & Wagon arm in 1950. The factory was to be retooled to produce commercial vehicles. In order to speed up the process, a joint-venture with Bush Motors was made. Bush would give the design of their 1947 Pick-Up and send some of the parts in a CKD regime, prior to final assembly in Curitiba. In return, the EP1 would be sold in North America under the Baltazar-Bush EP1 name. To seal the deal, the new Baltazar Commercial company would have a 50/50 split in ownership between the Brazilians and the Americans, and Bush would invest 15 million dollars in Baltazar Automóveis, buying it a 20% share of the company, while the Brazilians received 4.7% of the non-voting capital of Bush Motors.

In 1951, production of the Baltazar-Bush Pick-Up began at the Curitiba factory.

At the same time, both Bonham and Bush were requesting a new car to be sold on the more developed markets. The project Salsa was born, aiming to fill the gap between the EP1 and the more expensive and luxurious Bonham models, catering to both the European and American requirements. Due to the limited market for such cars in Brazil, production didn’t take place in Brazil, with a new factory being built in the UK, near the Bonham headquarters in Worcestershire. That factory was to be owned by Baltazar Europe, another joint-venture with split capital, this time between Baltazar Automóveis and Bonham Cars.

Project Salsa resulted in the 1955 Baltazar Basil. Co-developed with Bonham and catered to the European tastes, the car had advanced independent suspension all around and an innovative monocoque chassis. The car was far larger than the EP1, yet still small, qualifying as a small family sedan on the European market.
The US received that car as the Baltazar-Bush Basil, with the Baltazar-Bush nameplate being used until the 1980s for all the city, small and medium sized monocoque, and later, FWD models. Where as the Bush nameplate continued to be used in all body-in-frame vehicles, full size models and trucks. Both Baltazar-Bush and Bush models were sold alongside in Bush Motors dealerships for decades, until the marques split and went their own paths. However, to this day there are some joint dealerships across North America.


Generations [LORE, UE4] [RD 7 RESULTS, RD 8 OPEN]
#70

The 1955 Basil was a step in the right direction for Baltazar to cater for the american customer. However, it was still too small, being categorized as a subcompact. Sales were good, but not outstanding. However, monocoque seemed like the way to go. Therefore, Baltazar and Bush got together, once again, now to create a larger sedan, designed specifically for the North American market. The resulting car was the

1964 Baltazar-Bush Pollux

Despite being nearly a foot longer in wheelbase than the Basil and over 2 feet longer overall, the Pollux still qualified as a compact car, with its 4.58m length and 2.68m wheelbase. Much of the engineering of the Pollux was derived from the smaller Basil, however some of the european refinements stayed on that car in order to cut costs. The Pollux kept a double wishbone suspension front suspension system and the longitudinal RWD layout, but the independent rear suspension was scrapped and in its place a traditional solid axle set up was used.

Under the bonnet, or hood as the americans would put it, a lot was different too. An automatic gearbox was available from the start, and the engine options were much larger and more powerful. The base engine was a 2.7 inline 6, a British design from Bonham, which was made in America as part of the three sided deal on the 1955 project Salsa. Top of the range was the traditional Bush V8, with the most powerful model featuring a 5.4 litre displacement and 202 hp.


Generations [LORE, UE4] [RD 7 RESULTS, RD 8 OPEN]
#71

After 4 years in the market, the Pollux needed a refresh, bringing it up to the standards set by the rivals.
Despite being praised by specialised media, the car still wasn’t up to scratch in a couple of areas, so special attention was given to ride and handling.

At the same time, engineers were working on new variants to expand the market appeal of the car, including the 1965 Coupe and Wagon models. But along with the facelift, the wagon also received a jacked up, off-road ready 4x4 model, using running gear and tech from the Bush Pick-Up. That model was called the Crosstrail and it became a long running part of the american Baltazar, Baltazar-Bush and Bush models.

At the same time, the engines were given a refresh, with updates to both the straight six and V8 models. The V8 engine was stroked up to 342 CI (5.6 litres) with an added 18 hp, for a total of 220. Newer and improved brakes were added, as was the gearbox revised on all models. A 3-speed automatic was an optional for those seeking comfort.

Individual bucket seats were standard on the V8 sedans and coupes, with it being an option on the sedans. A front bench was standard across the range on the straight six models, in all body styles.

Below, some photos of the 1968 facelift models and the new for 1969 Crosstrail Wagon.

1968 Baltazar-Bush Pollux

1968 Baltazar-Bush Pollux Wagon V8 in Cream Yellow

1969 Baltazar-Bush Pollux Wagon Crosstrail

1969 Baltazar-Bush Pollux Crosstrail Wagon V8 in Ocre

Generations [LORE, UE4] [RD 7 RESULTS, RD 8 OPEN]
#72

1968 Bush Halong

The partnership between Baltazar and Bush began as the Brazilian government wanted to buy american truck designs, to be produced in Brazil. Little did they know that 2 decades later, the companies would be collaborating to design and build cars in the USA. After the successful 1964 Pollux compact sedan, the two companies went to design a small 4x4 utility vehicle, designed to tackle rough roads and difficult terrain, with outstanding off-road capacity, in an affordable and robust vehicle.

A suspension design similar to that of the Pollux was chosen, featuring coil springs over solid axles front and rear. 4x4 transmission, with a mechanical wheel locking mechanism was available. Powering the Halong, the small straight six engine originally designed for the Basil sedan, in 2 states of tune. The most powerful of which was the 1650-6 model, with 77 hp, enough for the lightweight 4x4.

For 1972, the car suffered a minor facelift, with new indicators and parking lights, plus new colour options.

Shown a 1973 Fixed Cab model, in Vanilla over Forest Green