Home | Wiki | Discord | Dev Stream | YouTube | Archived Forums | Contact

Chrysalis Motors - Unreal Engine reboot


#21

Oh man, a triple-whammy of cars!

But truth be told, the Florida is arms and shoulders above the rest. It’s that type of period-correct design that could work in both American and European markets, without the need of adding and/or changing fixtures!

I really love the sedan because of that great tailight arrangement, but the wagon’s blue is so much nicer on the eyes… Tough decision, that. :thinking:


#22

The 1000 was a rear-engined compact car for European buyers, powered by an 997cc inline four, through a 4 speed manual box. Produced ins four-door Sedan and and two-door Sport version. Power was 50HP which was enough for 130km/h top speed.

1966 Chrysalis 1000 Sedan


1966 Chrysalis 1000 Sport



#23

1968 Chrysalis Clipper Cargo

A small van with an 1500cc inline-4 for Europe. Compact and economical, ideal for small business and town traffic.




#24

1950 Chrysalis Clipper Cargo

The first Clipper series. Powered by an 1400cc flat-four, producing 55hp. Top speed was 120km/h.


1950 Chrysalis Clipper Traveller

The microbus version of the Clipper.


#25

This feels more like a 1984 design. The hidden lights bring to mind an AE86 and the nose shape recalls that and many mid 1980s Japanese compacts and sports cars like the Corolla, Civic, and CRX. When I think mid 1970s Euro GT, I am more in the mind of a Mercedes R107.

Its a good design; don’t misinterpret me there. It just feels too modern for its target year.

The side design on these three is lacking, ESPECIALLY the Victoria. At least in America, 1946 cars hadn’t achieved 1950s level excess but they were still ornamented heavily. The van I am willing to excuse because, well, its a van, but the sides of the 1000 and the Victora risk putting me to sleep.

As with before though, both good designs overall.

In fact I am interested to see what you could do if you actually tried to create canon and continuity between your cars. :wink:

No need to cater though. You do whatever you want because its good nonetheless.


#26

This feels more like a 1984 design. The hidden lights bring to mind an AE86 and the nose shape recalls that and many mid 1980s Japanese compacts and sports cars like the Corolla, Civic, and CRX.

I strongly disagree. Many GT cars in from the late '60s featured pop-up headlights. Maserati Khamsin, Ferrari 400GT, Triumph TR7, Porsche 914. The 70’s was the Golden Age of hidden lights.
The Calypso has lot’s of typical '70s details: chrome trim all around. Around the windows, on the bumpers, detailing the rear lights, everywhere. The bumpers having big rubber inlays for the new for 1974 USA regulations (they must had towithstand any collision without damage up to 5mph.) The mirrors also basic chrome mirrors, in the '70s color-coded plastic mirrors were not isn fashion yet (with some exception like the Porsche 930.)
The B-pillar with the stainless-steel trim and the Fuchs-styled alloy wheels are also typical '70s fashion as the vivid metallic citrus-green color.

The '80s Japanese models you mentioned doesn’t have too much common features with the Calypso apart from the pop-up lights. They have plastic bumpers (color coded or black), under that plastic aero. The trim is usually black plastic as well, in the mid '80s chrome around the windows wasn’t n fashion. Details like mirrors and door handles were more integrated into the body shape, and on most fashionable models theye were color-coded.

I know that the AE86 Corolla is a cult machine for many people but I haven’t had it in mind when I designed the Calypso. The Bitter SC, well, that inspired me more. :slight_smile:

Lacking side designs: well, the Victoria could use some more chrome, but I wasn’t in the mood to tinker with it.

The '66 1000 is a cheap compact car, rivals were the NSU Prinz, Renault 8, Simca 1000, Skoda S100 (the last one largely inspired me designing the rear of the Chrysalis 1000.) If you check out those cars they similar in fashion I think. Not too much trim on them.

The van I am willing to excuse because, well, its a van

That’s it Sir! :slight_smile: It’s a van. A workhorse.

but the sides of the 1000 and the Victora risk putting me to sleep.

Good night and nice dreams for you. :slight_smile:

I am interested to see what you could do if you actually tried to create canon and continuity between your cars.

I’ve written the reasons why I don’t create a canon in the opening post of this thread.

  1. I’m too lazy for that.
  2. It would limit my “sandbox” and limit my fun: maybe I’ll be in the mood to design another mid-60s rear engined compact, in the same category like the 1000. Would it be realistic in a car company history? Of course not. And stuff like that. This way I can design cheap compacts, and expensive sports cars, both American and European style. Maybe even Japanese in the future. :slight_smile: So no, I’m not planning to create a lore, a canon, sorry man.

#27

Concerning the Calypso, yes it has many details seen on 1970s cars but to be fair, most of those were also seen on 1980s cars (early 1980s at least) exceptions namely the wheels and mirrors. The way they are put together, it looks more 1980s to me. One of the biggest things that is throwing me off is the body, which sure resembles the Maserati and Ferrari you quoted but a more subdued version with straightened edges and a flattened cross-section. The Maserati and the Ferrari had very shapely sides while this body is slab-sided, like an early 80s machine.

The body is still not what’s killing it for me though; its the positioning of the popups - in step-up from the bumper; that is exactly like the AE86. Which – like it or not – is a more likely to be recalled merely because of how common it is in addition to “cult machine” status. The Maserati and Ferrari on the other hand, the popups are entirely on the top of the hood and both have more of a V nose rather than a snub nose. Granted, the morphs might not allow for that, but those features are where my thoughts are coming from.

I am coming out of this vacillating to and fro on whether or not the Calypso is 1970s machine and maybe part of that is how upper end Euro cars largely carried over from the 1970s to the 1980s (>.> R107). If nothing else, I acknowledge your argument holds water.


As for the 1000, all of the cars you quoted had more side detailing - granted not much but they had it all the same. They just about all had the rocker panel strip the 1000 has. Additionally, the Skoda and Simca have edges stamped into the sheet metal at door handle level and the NSU, Renault, and – bonus – some Ladas of the same era all have a single chrome strip at the same position.


I know. It was a jab in good humor. I don’t seriously expect you to act on my goad as I clarified immediately following it and which I am doing again now. :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:


#28

1972 Chrysalis 850

Modern FWD compact with a light, full-aluminium, 850cc SOHC-I4. Suspension is McPherson at the front, torsion-bar at the back.

Power: 44hp
Weight: 621kg
Top speed: 125 km/h
Accel. 0-100km/h: 16.4s



#29

1984 Chrysalis Galaga 2.2 GL EFI

Large sedan against the Audi 100, Ford Sierra, Peugeot 505, Mazda 626 and similar cars.
2.2 SOHC I4 with 8 valves, with single-point EFI, 118hp
Gearbox: 5spd manual
Layout: FWD with longitudal engine at the front.




Kraut Space Magic
#30

The Chrysalis Carol modell-range. Debuted at the 1984 Geneva Auto Show. Despite their fairly advanced engines (3 valves/cylinder, EFI) most Carols were basic vehicles, with no power-steering, 2 speaker radio. To offer a more civilized version of their small car Chrysalis launched the Carol Lux at the 1985 Frankfurt Auto Show. It featured power-steering, central-lock and power windows, a 4 speaker audio system, color-coded bumpers and mirrors, full-size wheel-covers and an exclusive chrome inserted grille.


#31

The 850 is adorable and the Galaga has a lot of charm… Love it!!


#32

Rarely has such a simple design been so appealing. The 850 is just… nice. Its so nice. Very pleasing to look at.

Even despite how faithfully real it looks, it has the quintessential 1970s small car cartoonish look. In fact its remarkably like the Honda Civic / VW Rabbit / Chevy Chevette thing that Calvin’s parents drives in Calvin & Hobbes


#33

Thanks!
Well, it somehow become a mashup of different styles. The 3D model is a Fiat 126 look-alike. I wanted to make it different from the 126 so I made the 850 front-engine/FWD. The grille-headlamp configuration has some VW/Audi touch - Audi 60 for example - but also resemble the Mk2 Fiat 127. The color is also a typical '70s Fiat green, “Verde Oliva” . From the rear it’s more like it’s from Japan.
Agreed on the cartoonish look - I think the cause of it that the base 3D model, the Fiat 126 is a mini-car. It was the successor of the Fiat 500. The fixtures and style elements I snapped onto it look like they’re from something bigger. But in overall I like the end result. I started the design about two months ago but I wasn’t satisfied with the looks, but now it come together.


#34

1978 Chrysalis 1010

The European production of the rear-engined Chrysalis 1000 ceased in 1973. Buyer interest moved towards front engined FWD constructions in the compact category, sales number began a rapid decline from 1970.
The 1000 was still considered well built, easy to maintain car, and it was cheap to build. In 1975 the its manufacturing machinery was sold to Argentina, where it found its place in the market.
To keep the looks of the car fresh it got a cosmetic update in 1978 and renamed to Chrysalis 1010. Under the shell the construction remained unchanged, apart from minor details like the radiator repositioned to the front. For untrained eyes the 1010 even looked like a front enginged car with the new black plastic grille on its nose. Production ended in 1989.


#35

1980 Chrysalis 850 Phase 2



#36

You got the magic touch, friend. Keep rolling the awesomeness.
Would love to do a collab car with you.


#37

In 1979 Chrysalis Motors launched the Buffalo series, which contained V8 pickup trucks in three different trim: the entry level Farmer, the better equipped Prairie and the top of the line Boss.

The Boss was powered by an 5.7 V8: with a dual quad-barrel carb setup and a high-compression head it developed a healthy 280HP. The lesser Buffalos used the same engine block with a single double-barrel carb, and lower compression rate for lesser grade fuel.

1979 Chrysalis Buffalo Farmer

1979 Chrysalis Buffalo Prairie

1979 Chrysalis Buffalo Boss


In 1980 a passanger carrier version of the Buffalo debuted, called the Grand Wagon.

1980 Chrysalis Buffalo Boss Grand Wagon


#38

Not really a Ford, not really a Chevy, not really a RAM… but still a very attractive design! It’s not common to see a pickup truck that isn’t so much like one of the big three, and this is its own awesome design. Love it!


#39

The Veloce was Chrysalis’ entry to the luxury GT market in the early '60s. Powered by a 4.8L V12 the Veloce was a capable to reach 244km/h top speed. In Lusso Automatico trim it had power steering and a 3 speed automatic gearbox. Later was choosen mainly for targeting American customers.

The Competizione was the racing version of the Veloce. With larger bore displacement was increased to 5L. Added modified air filters and a special racing exhaust system, power output reached 360HP (for comparison the Lusso had 310HP). A 4spd manual gearbox replaced the standard automatic unit. The manual shifter later become an option for the Lusso. The Veloce Competizione’s top speed was 262km/h.

1962 Chrysalis Veloce Lusso Automatico


1962 Chrysalis Veloce Competizione



#40

The Pluto was Chrysalis’ first FWD car, debuted in 1960, Geneva. Its all aluminium four cylinder engine delivered 58 HP in Sport trim. Top speed wasn’t any spectacular at 135 km/h, but due to its light weight (under 650kg) it accelerated from 0 to 100km/h under 12 seconds. The Pluto Sport featured front disc brakes which was very uncommon in its category in 1960. Its wheels were positioned to the corners of the chassis - this and the low centre of gravity and the FWD layout gave very good handling characteristicsto this small car.

1960 Chrysalis Pluto Sport


In 1962 a small monster appeared on the rally courses of the world. The nimble Pluto was a perfect platform for a small rally car. The aluminium block remained unchanged from the base model, but it received a high compression head and a four-barrel carburetor. Air-intake and exhaust system replaced with higher flow units. These developments increased the power output from 58 to 80 HP. Of course, regular fuel was not an option anymore, 98 octane gas was required at least. Tire width was increased from 135 to 155mms, rim diameter from 11 to 12 inches. The Pluto Rally catapulted from 0 to 100km/h under 9.5s, top speed was 148 km/h.

1962 Chrysalis Pluto Rally

In 1962 a small monster appeared on the rally courses of the world. The nimble Pluto was a perfect platform for a small rally car. The aluminium block remained unchanged from the base model, but it received a high compression head and a four-barrel carburetor. Air-intake and exhaust system replaced with higher flow units. These developments increased the power output from 58 to 80 HP. Of course, regular fuel was not an option anymore, 98 octane gas was required at least. Tire width was increased from 135 to 155mms, rim diameter from 11 to 12 inches. The Pluto Rally catapulted from 0 to 100km/h under 9.5s, top speed was 148 km/h.