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FIGHT ME (Market Research Gryphon Gear style)


#183

@CNCharger1 For the love of god, read the first post and realise that the deadline for this competition was nearly 5 months ago.


#184

To be fair the question still didn’t specify whether that was with the intent of sending it into this challenge, lol.

So to answer the question, can CNC make a car for less than 35k? Well, I have no idea. May you? Sure, but not to enter this challenge. The deadline was nearly 5 months ago and I’m 3/4 through the reviews and post-hoc analyses.


#186

Let’s leave stuff that isn’t GMR related out of this thread :joy:


#187

I wasn’t applying for this ompetition. But with Royal out of the picture, I can make a car for under 35K.


#188

Y’know, I think I speak for all of us when I say we’d really love to see that creation. :+1:


#189

Ok, back to business, sorry for the extremely lengthy delay. Between work (new interns on my double take, yay!), study (big exams in 4 weeks, yay!) and everything else it’s looking pretty unlikely I’ll be able to get all the reviews done before Feb 19 (the exam). Which is shocking. Very sorry about that. But no matter how long it takes I’ll still get them all done and do the proper analysis after, you can bet on that.

Today we’ll be bringing you two extremely contrasting vehicles: a bus of a hot hatch, and the thinnest meme.


@Leonardo9613

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First Impressions- Strop

Quasar, a highly regarded, long running model, with multiple awards under its belt for being bulletproof value. Having successfully expanded beyond their South American homeland into the NA and EU markets, with the opening of the Asia-Pacific market the Australian customers are clearly in their sights with a small release of their full range, all the way from their entry-level Tellurium to this range topper, the RS325, named for its 325 horses, definitely quite north of what one would normally consider Quasar fare. Little hints adorn the hood and bodywork, but Baltazar keep it restrained, letting its image do the talking. In many senses, it strays from its comfortable and convenient ecobox roots far less than many of the other entrants here. Accordingly, I’m guessing that it’s going to be offering a softer ride than the sporty oriented offerings here. I’m definitely curious as to how it stacks up with the ever increasingly complicated demands of the modern hot hatch owner.

First Impressions- Kai

The Germans, they’re in every car now.

Driven Civilly

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Shromet eat your heart out, the North Americans aren’t king of plush this time around. Despite the rather cosy seating setup thanks to the format, the experience is more akin to being swaddled in featherdown blankets than, say, the “well this is actually kinda cramped” of the Armada Fore. It’s also whisper quiet, almost literally. Lexus levels of quiet. This, plus the AWD drivetrain makes for quite the bus of a hatch, the true polar opposite to the Fore. Apart from the relatively subtle external visual cues, the only thing that immediately lets you know this model has a bit of pep to it is the upgraded row-your-own with the fairly meaty, precise clutch. More subtle cues would be the gauge cluster, sporting higher numbers on the boost gauge and the redline. But it’s when you start the car and apply throttle you realise wait, something is definitely up here. Down low, it’s all business as usual, but hit a certain point and a big hand scoops you up and flings you down the road. Clearly the 325 gets its number from not being boost-shy, but the engine’s been heavily upgraded to match its character, so it’s not so much frantic and raucous, so much as underscored with a certain gravitas. The result is the sensation of unstoppable momentum, like the Juggernaut, bitch. It’s not surprising therefore that the ride is more muted and pliant and the brake feel softer. But far from abandoning the driver, the steering is precise and the chassis surprisingly nimble, only understeering a little when pushing hard on the long on-ramp test.

Driven Hard




On the Hillclimb- Strop

Out of just about all the cars tested today, the Quasar was the one that stepped the least out of (or into!) character when pushed hard. It’s mostly all Dr Jekyll in here. The only thing that really changed was the boost coming in full bore, filling the cabin with an airy rasp. By civilian car standards this was by no means a slow car, but it was also one that did not even care to offer particularly aspirational sporting credentials in the form of visceral thrills or rock hard suspension and twitchy steering. Aside from the work keeping the car in the powerband, it offered the same solid, stable ride at speed as it did in the city. The boost itself wasn’t even particularly tricky, given the high weight and the AWD. It was a drive that you could easily think to yourself pushed the limits of the car but didn’t make you particularly nervous, so long as you remembered you had to brake on time. In this day and age, 200hp/kg is more the realm of the “rather warm” than the out and out “hot”, but at the same time, 325hp is… you know what it’s all going to get more nuts as time goes on. If not for the amount of boost required to get it to where it does (and that’s still pretty far behind the opposition), the Quasar would be the sane one.

On the Hillclimb- Kai

No drama, no worries, no excitement… better than valium.

On the track

I hope you aren’t racing to win. The Quasar wasn’t built for winning races and it’s not pretending to try either. This isn’t some cheaty stripped clubsport article, it’s the full fat cruising machine that goes fairly briskly in a straight line, but with the exception of the Shromet is pretty much in a different class of car. Outgunned by the tourers, out-cornered and out-braked by the other hatches and completely outclassed by the dedicated sports cars, just be content to wave them by as you steer around corners with one hand and a mug of tea in the other, your spine not creaking from excessive G-forces and your ears not ringing from all the road roar from those low-profile tyres. Know that speed is in the eye (and the arse) of the beholder, and, well, you’re not prepared to compromise on your philosophy of life just to squeeze a few seconds off.

Pros

  • Genuine Quasar article
  • Inoffensive and pleasant to live with
  • Won’t ruffle your feathers unless you don’t like boost

Cons

  • A lot of engineering and boost for not a huge amount of gain
  • The only people who would really want to buy this would be people who think they want a sports car but they don’t know anything about sports cars so they go for the sporty version of the reliable normal car they know and love which means it’s going to sell a lot and damn that’s a smart if a bit cynical move how dare you.

What Real Car is this like?

A mix of the VW Golf R and the Ford Focus RS

How much would it sell for in the real world?

~35000

Verdict

You thought you wanted to go fast but actually you just wanted a faster Quasar.


@Mr.Computah

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First Impressions- Strop

Putting the rocket in Pocket Rocket, this kei-sized box is barely a nose longer than Accursio Criceto Metro, but instead of going for outlandishly lavish, it decided to go full hardcore instead. It’s worth noting that this is a car that is expected to wildly exceed budget, else be sold at an astounding loss, having been essentially rebuilt from the ground up from its very City counterpart into a carbon-bodied racing spec super special edition. The exhaust, the intakes, the tyres, are all beyond any regular road spec. Hell, even the engine is on the opposite end of the car. I’m not even convinced the authorities will let it drive on the roads, even though it technically passes muster. Beyond being a technical exercise whether or not anybody buys this will be largely up to just how crazy people get over miniature racers right off the factory floor, or whether they still prefer to hot it up themselves. Certainly there is plenty of success in the sporty small car market, but going this far, while it stirs a certain curiosity for me, may well be dampened by the sacrifices and costs. Is it too much?

First Impressions- Kai

If it’s gonna be 9/10 obnoxious I don’t see why we don’t turn up the boost and shoot for 15.

Driven Civilly

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*100 units total

I’ll say one thing: while it’s a perversion of the original, or even a complete re-envisaging, this Pulga has purpose. The interior is snappy ergonomic glue-you-to-the-seat just shut up and drive stuff that channels the screaming exhaust note right to your ears. There’s little distraction, just the wheel, the pedal and the flappy paddles (and a bare minimum of amenities). The ride is… the ride… the ride is actually just plain crashy. The car shifts and jitters around on every bump and that’s because a split second after hitting the bump the springs slam into the bump stops and the whole body bounces as a result. Every bump. And just about every corner, too. I mean, the original MX-5 liked to ride on its bump stops (no sway bar) but this was shooting for a very different experience. It kind of reminds me of the time I was driving behind this ultra riced 2005 Toyota Echo, decked out with all the body kit and ridiculous muffler and riding about 2 inches off the ground. I almost rear-ended the fucker because it slammed on the brakes so it didn’t lose half its kit to a pothole. Speaking of which, fuck speed humps, fuck driveways, and fuck manhole covers. I kind of understand what it’s like to be a motorcyclist now, except in this car you’re doing the ride on 25 profile tyres you won’t find outside a specialist race outfitter. Puts the hard in hardcore. What’s far less hardcore, as Kai mentioned earlier, is the ultra low boost turbo. It’s so restricted that apart from a tiny bit of lag, there seems to be almost no discernible difference to what would probably be a much more raucous and responsive ride if one had just stick to letting the exhaust run out the back instead of recirculating it.

Driven Hard




On the Hillclimb- Strop

Let’s put the suspension issues aside, and call them character. I expected big things from the little Pulga. With a comparatively modest power to weight ratio of 207bhp:ton (not much more than a Toyota Aurion, for example), this was going to rely on being light and having a wide track width to stick to the road and blast around those corners. And sure enough it had oodles of grip. The front is light and floaty and tends to wobble more over the bumps, but at full tilt, the hairpins can really crush you in your seat. In terms of dynamic cornering it was second only to the Criceto at low speeds, and with its setup, it felt much much faster. The over 10k redline comes to the fore here, encouraging, nay, demanding that you absolutely rev the tits off it banging through five of its six gears. But take care, while the car has power steering that it probably doesn’t need, it instead lacks stability control, catching the unwary driver who has never driven rear-engine. But with that mastered, this here is the true cornering machine, punching well above its flyweight. Thing is, with the right tuning it would probably do much more again.

On the Hillclimb- Kai

Good thing about the wide stance is the box won’t roll over in the corners.

On the track

The Calder Track favours fast cars, there’s no doubt about that. It’s one thing for a certain Fujiwara to fling a lightly tuned AE86 down the Mt Haruna touge, but you’d be dreaming if you could think that being the protagonist of your own manga will save the AE86 from getting blasted off an actual race track by something with more power. As it were, this car was absolutely blasted past by just about every other car on the Thunderdome, while almost nudging the rev limiter at its top speed of 197km/h. But to its credit, it used its crazy cornering powers to cling onto and even avenge itself against some of the tourers and budget sports coupes. But consider that this car is far more expensive than half of them and far harder to live with than the other half, and it’s enough to give you pause to consider your priorities. You must really want to have a special edition Pulga to get this car. Or, you’re desperate to wring the hell out of a tiny car and are willing to pay some serious dollar to do so. The mysterious appeal versus cognitive dissonance of the remade Pulga is certainly something worth exploring in more detail later on, so stay tuned.

Pros

  • I love the idea
  • I really want to like this car

Cons

  • But it makes no realistic sense
  • It takes what should be approached with simplicity and makes it quite complicated
  • And most of the choices and tuning ends up punishing the driver

What Real Car is this like?

A Mitsubishi Colt Ralliart on an Olympic training regimen and several illegal supplements

How much would it sell for in the real world?

~80000 and bring your own trailer

Verdict

When it comes to hotting up ecoboxes, there comes a point where one has to ask what the point actually is. This is so far beyond that one should consider seeing if it can be sanctioned for competition instead.

Disclaimer: not that this is going to stop us from keeping the unit we’ve been gifted… for… science…


#190

Hey people, I have some, er, bad news. My PC has just burnt out.

Right now I can’t tell if it’s just a temp sensor or more likely I’ve fried the mobo. The power source is fine. If it doesn’t boot I’m yanking the HDD and trying to salvage.

If that doesn’t work then what I’ll need is for people who haven’t been reviewed yet to send me their cars one more time. I will go through the list and tag everybody so I can get this done (it will be next week, I have an exam to sit in 7 days). I don’t know how well this laptop can handle Automation (it’s a word processor and internet browser not a gaming laptop). So we’ll see.


#191

Sorry for the double post, I have some even better news.

So I was going to fix my PC and resume reviewing earlier this week. That won’t happen now. Why?

Feb 19th was the day I was supposed to sit a very important exam. We spend years preparing for it on top of working full time and it all comes down to one day, all over Australia and New Zealand.

This year, the body that sets the exam saw fit to attempt to change the format of the exam which required outsourcing the administration of the exam to an external company.

In short, the execution of the exam was so badly botched that it had to be abandoned just as I was completing the sixth and final hour, thus prompting a state of national emergency because the exam requires that 1200 doctors across Aus/NZ get pulled out of their jobs in public hospitals for four days to sit it and is well known to be a locus of junior doctor suicides, so, as you can imagine, fucking it up only exacerbates all these things. The exam has been rescheduled, but not before several major news outlets reported on it, the Australian Medical Association submitted a letter of demand, lawyers started crafting a class-action lawsuit against the college, and the Federal Health Minister had to get involved.

To summarise, the exam is the centrepiece of their candidate assessment and gateway to specialisation. This is the most colossal fuck up the RACP has ever achieved in the history of Australian medicine.

Our new exam date is March 2nd. The week after that, I return to work in Adult Internal Medicine.

I’ll do my best to get my computer fixed and finish the reviews in the weeks after that. But unfortunately if I could have done anything better, it would have been to finish the reviews long before this point. As it stands I should really be cramming some more right now.


#192

Ouch. Good luck with the retake. Hope it goes better the second time around.


#193

okay sorry about the long dead thread. A number of things have happened:

  • I resat the exam on March 2nd
  • I found out on March 15th that I passed the exam thank fucking god finally do you know how many years it took me???
  • I rebuilt my PC with all new parts and kind of overkill because I’ve not been looking at the market for 4 years and had no clue
  • And therefore realised too late that my CPU doesn’t run Win 7 unless I really force it to and play silly buggers with the BIOS which I… can’t be bothered to
  • And MS Office 2010 doesn’t run in Windows 10
  • Also work is busier than usual and now I am preparing for the next exam in August, so it’s hard for me to squeeze everything in

But I’ve finally got all my hardware and software updated, my files back in order, and I am ready to get this done even if nobody cares about Kee anymore. I’ll get going next weekend. There should be 8 or so cars left.