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Your guilty car pleasure/confession


#262

One way to distinguish between both is the headlights. You can see that the C class has one strip going down the headlight, but the E class has two. Small detail, but it really helps out for me


#263

Something slightly different, but on-topic since this is about confessions and guilty car pleasures right? So here’s one:

I ragged the hell out of my hire car:

image

driving through a Slovenian mountain pass:

in order to meat meet Mr Žnopresk himself, @NormanVauxhall (selfies not included)

I was a little ambitious in my target and had a tight schedule, and because I was staying in Triglav National Park which is lovely but also very out of the way, all of it was on these tiny roads you could barely squeeze a B seg on while hurtling around blind corners and hairpins hoping you didn’t plow into a car/van/cyclist/pedestrian/tractor or fly off the edge off a cliff/into a tree/into a house.

Forty kilometers of this stuff be like Initial D Rally yeeeee boi

The gradients were also quite steep, the poor 0.9L 3-pot could barely handle the uphill. The downhill, however, was pure left-foot braking, heel-toe downshift Eurobeat Intensifies. It’s not speeding if you don’t actually break the posted speed limit, right? But the real trick is doing the posted speed limit around a hairpin!

Without the immediate threat of wrapping oneself around a tree or flying off into a gorge, the view was spectacular.

The village of Kneža, from the road above

All-in-all, the mission was successful, I was back home in time for tea, and the car was none the worse for wear (I won’t mention anything about the slightly cooked brakes). And I know how many people here speak of the joys of the mountain pass. But it was a bit reckless, hence a guilty pleasure.


#264

Hehe I ninja’d you on that one;)


#265

Oh shit I didn’t realize lol


#266

Buick


#267

If you ever go visit Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming/Montana USA, I highly suggest you drive US212 Beartooth Highway. I get the sense you would have a lot of fun :smirk:.


image

Not only is it switchbacks and hairpins galore but the view is so jaw-dropping beautiful that it practically shouldn’t be allowed.


#268

Saving in a list of locations to visit in the USA intensifies


#269

Don’t get me wrong - the Alfa 4C is a thing of beauty, and is currently the most affordable car you can buy anywhere to have a carbon tub - but after years of hype and anticipation, it turned out to be so half-baked that it should not even have been built in the first place. With sports cars, either you give it 100%, or not at all.

Not only does it not have the electrically-assisted power steering it desperately deserves, the suspension geometry is all wrong - especially with a McPherson strut rear end instead of the more commonly seen double wishbone setup - and it will never be available with a manual gearbox; instead, it’s a DCT or nothing, which dulls the fun factor somewhat. As for the engine, even though it makes all the right noises, at the end of the day, it’s just another sub-2-liter turbo 4-cylinder, and haven’t we had enough of those nowadays?

Then again, if the 4C had not gone into production at all, Alfaworks would not have been able to offer its rather wonderful aftermarket package for the much-maligned model - and prove that it could still be redeemed in spite of its shortcomings.

And a few years back, MOTOR Magazine suggested its plan to save the 4C from being an also-ran among small sports cars - a plan that, due to lack of funds, sadly could never have come to fruition:

As it stands, however, the 4C, with its tendency to tramline, unnecessarily heavy steering, generic drivetrain combination and lack of overall poise make it a pale imitation of a genuine Italian supercar, let alone a more affordable German sports car - which in this case was the 981 Cayman. The 4C seems even more pointless when you consider that it’s much more worthwhile to spend more money on a decent 360 Modena with a manual gearbox - and have a purer, more authentic supercar experience in the process.

Thankfully, with the release of the Giulia and Stelvio (especially the flagship QV versions of both), it’s safe to say that, after a quarter-century in the wilderness, Alfa Romeo has finally rediscovered how to build legitimate drivers’ cars for enthusiasts to enjoy.