T.D.F. Ltd

TDF is a british-italian automaker formed in 1929 under S.T. Herman Motorcars. It is known for it’s legendary V8 powered grand tourers, and 6 cylinder luxury cars.

Products

WIP

Engines
Imported

WIP

In-House

Heiress
Produced: 1929-1959
Layout: OHV 12v R6
Construction: cast iron
Displacement: 3.8-5.5L
Notes: Supercharged versions had many LeMans wins, very succesful race engine

Empress
Produced: 1932-1959
Layout: OHV 24v V12
Constuction: cast iron
Displacement: 7.8-10.8L
Notes: known for being incredibly smooth

Heiress II
Produced: 1960-1964
Layout: DOHC 12v R6
Constuction: cast block, alu heads
Displacement: 3.8-5.5L
Notes: Last hurrah of TDF I6s

Excelsior
Produced: 1980-1993
Layout: DOHC 32v V8
Construction: aluminum
Displacement: 3.5-5.0L
Notes: developed as racing engine, replaced imported engines for a short time

Outdated
The 40s


An A15 Taxi

TDF’s first car was the A series, launcheed in 1940. Powered by a 42hp 3-cylinder motor (for the A15 models), and it had the bare essentials of a car, and the sedan was a poular taxi. It came in A15 4-door sedan, A21 4-door sedan, A21-4 4-door sedan, A15 3-door wagon, A21 3-door wagon, A21-4 3-door wagon, A21 pickup, A21-4 picup, A21 van, and A21-4 van models. The A15 was available with 2 and 3-speed manuals, while A21s got 3 speeds and A21-4s 4-speeds and 4wd. The A21-4 vans were popular mail carriers into the early 60s.


A B35 Saloon taking a drive down a canyon road

The next model was the B Saloon, released in '48. It was a fullsized luxury car, and had i6s ranging from 2.6-3.5 litres in displacement. It survived only until '53.

The 50s


A C29 prototype, on it’s way to a farm house.

In 1953, the TDF C29 was introduced. With a 129hp 2.9L i6, the revolutionary executive car could get to 122mph! It was an amazing car, but it didn’t sell great. In 1957, it got a brand-new DOHC 2.1L i6.

A range of more affordable cars cars were introduced in 1955- the tiny E, smallish D, and midsized DL.

NAM 191 by TDF

In 1963, TDF was a succesful automaker and recently, design house. They were well known for the fiberglass Renaissance C22, Renaissance Coupe SS22, and Executive B49. NAM was a Soviet automaker that was preparing to enter the european market. Executives at NAM contacted many design firms to woprk on their new car, but eventually settled with TDF on February 13th, 1963. Chairman of S.T. Herman motorcars (TDF’s parent company), Stevi L. Herman Jr. handed Andrej Vumam this picture on the December 1st, 1963-

NAM was happy with it, and Project Eurotype was started. NAM set the requirements as so-

  • Based on NAM 171
  • Cost less than 3000 OR be competitive to a Onaria type 71
  • Compatable with 91 RON Leaded

The final product was a beautiful, overpriced, luxury sport sedan that dampened any further buissness between the 2 companies. In 1967, the sporty 191/CS model was added to the range

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OUTDATED

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I like it, good job

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Thanks.

The reason that the series B was dropped in '54, was the fact that the C made it look bad. The B was a true luxury car, while the C29 was more of an executive. The C29’s double-wishbone front and rear suspension was very advanced, and the flush look of the bumpers was like nothing ever before. The C was not as comfortable, nor as big, but it was just too futuristic. In 1959, when the cars were given real names (DL became DL Columbus, E became E Mayfly, etc.), the C22 became the C Renaissance.

Exactly where is this new company based in?

Anyway, this is a great start for a brand. My only real gripe is that both the type and shape of the side vent fixtures on the C29 (of which there are three vents on each side) are too new for 1953, and would be more fitting for something made in the 1990s or 2000s. The flush-fitting bumpers are not exactly out of place for the era, though.

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OUTDATED

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Currently in the process of updating main post. Most of the outdated stuff is being moved to TDF’s (pre-1967) parent brand. The reason I’m making all of that outdated is that it doesn’t really fit with newer TDFs I made before I even joined this forum. I’m still considering tieing the outdated stuff in with the newer cars, but it would be a bit hard. Just thought I needed to do have some explanaition here.

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