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Mizuiro Motor Company


#1
Mizuiro Motor Company

Established in early 2000, the Mizuiro Motor Company (水色自動車株式会社 Mizuiro Jidōsha Kabushikigaisha) is the result of a merger between two Japanese automakers.


Rinkai Motor Company
Yoshioki Ishii (磯井栄興) was born on March 13, 1953 in Tsu, Mie Prefecture, Japan, and became enamoured with cars at a young age. However, it was only when his father, a mechanic, took him for a ride along the nearby winding highways that Ishii developed a fascination with speed and motorsports. With frequent visits to his father's garage, this fascination became a hobby, which in turn became a career when Ishii himself became a mechanic in 1969. He founded the Rinkai Motor Company (臨海自動車株式会社 Rinkai Jidōsha Kabushikigaisha) on January 28, 1974, aiming to bring the joy of driving to the masses with a car he had spent the prior year designing from scratch.

Shimizu Automotive
Originally Shimizu Motor Works, a manufacturer of handmade motorcycles founded in the 1930s, the company's business model was deemed unprofitable after the war and it subsequently began to mass-produce motorcycles. Over the following two decades, the company rebranded itself as Shimizu Heavy Industries (清水重工業株式会社 Shimizu Jūkōgyō Kabushikigaisha), and their manufacturing operations diversified to support a blossoming economy. Thus, it was only natural for them to enter the automotive industry as well. The Shimizu Automotive division's debut in 1967 came in the form of a luxury wagon, the Mont Blanc, that combined the company's newfound manufacturing aptitude with the attention to detail from their prewar days.

Vehicles

Shimizu Mont Blanc '67
Shimizu GP70 '68
Shimizu Gran Paradiso '71
Rinkai Every '74
Shimizu Matterhorn '78
Rinkai Kaizoe '83
Shimizu Lyskamm '87
Rinkai Tsuji '93
Rinkai JIKO '99
Rinkai Fujisaki JIKO GT500 '99
Mizuiro Hikyaku '00
Mizuiro Tenet '04
Mizuiro Hizoku '06
Mizuiro Hizoku TC '07
Mizuiro Kasui '09
Splash Mizuiro Kasui '09
Mizuiro Karai '12
Mizuiro Inuwashi '13
Mizuiro Kaizoe '14
Mizuiro Tozansha '17


#5
Rinkai Every '74
In 1974, an offering from a new automaker made waves in Japan with its seamless blend of practicality, sportiness, and value. With a starting price of ¥218,500 (roughly US$2,000), the Rinkai Every was a reliable, affordable two-door compact that, while easy to drive and maintain, was not particularly boring either.

The base Every Sport possessed completely original underpinnings, utilizing a galvanized steel monocoque chassis powered by a 1.5-litre inline-four capable of 60 kW (81 hp) at 5100 RPM. The addition of front and rear double-wishbone suspension was a risky proposition, but proved invaluable to the Every’s unique handling characteristics.

While the Every certainly wasn’t the most powerful or capable car of its time, it was among the most enjoyable to drive, a redeeming quality that kept it in the market for another seven years with minor trim changes.

Sport
SPECS
Layout FR
Aspiration NA
Displacement 1999 cc
Peak Power 60 kW (81 hp) @ 5100 RPM
Peak Torque 133 Nm (98 ft-lb) @ 3200 RPM
Weight 909 kg (2004 lb)
Weight Distribution Front/Rear 59/41
STARTING PRICE
¥218,500 JDM
$2,050 USDM
COLOURS

Tamago Yellow

Sky Blue

Ash White

Pewter Grey

Sumi Black
Roadsport
SPECS
Layout FR
Aspiration NA
Displacement 1999 cc
Peak Power 69 kW (93 hp) @ 5400 RPM
Peak Torque 138 Nm (102 ft-lb) @ 2600 RPM
Weight 940 kg (2072 lb)
Weight Distribution Front/Rear 59/41
STARTING PRICE
¥232,000 JDM
$2,200 USDM
COLOURS

Sunset Orange

Tamago Yellow

Sky Blue

Ash White

Pewter Grey

Sumi Black

#6

There’s a bit of first-gen Civic in the Rinkai Every. With its affordablity and lively road manners, it would have been the perfect set of wheels for the everyman during the dark age of motoring.


#7
Rinkai Kaizoe '83
While many kei cars on the market in 1983 were built primarily for practicality and value, Rinkai used a different approach. They saw plenty of opportunities in a kei car with a lower overall weight, and the Kaizoe (介添え; helper) was built with special attention to driving enjoyment.

The base T model came standard with a turbocharged 550 cc inline-three mated to a four-speed manual transmission, while the S model benefitted from an 8 kW (11 hp) power increase, disc brakes, lighter wheels, and stiffer suspension.

The Kaizoe quickly found buyers in those looking for a fun car on a budget, and it became one of the most popular kei cars of the mid-1980s, cementing Rinkai as a reputable producer of lightweight daily drivers.

T
SPECS
Layout FF
Aspiration TB
Displacement 550 cc
Peak Power 38 kW (51 hp) @ 6900 RPM
Peak Torque 60 Nm (44 ft-lb) @5300 RPM
Weight 774 kg (1707 lb)
Weight Distribution Front/Rear 58/42
STARTING PRICE
¥255,600 JDM
COLOURS

Maroon

Marsh Green

Coastal Blue

Snow Grey

Sumi Black
S
SPECS
Layout FF
Aspiration TB
Displacement 550 cc
Peak Power 46 kW (62 hp) @ 7800 RPM
Peak Torque 65 Nm (48 ft-lb) @ 6100 RPM
Weight 790 kg (1741 lb)
Weight Distribution Front/Rear 58/42
STARTING PRICE
¥349,600 JDM
COLOURS

Maroon

Marsh Green

Coastal Blue

Snow Grey

Sumi Black

#8
Rinkai Tsuji '93
Following the collapse of Japan's asset price bubble in 1992, Japanese automakers were scrambling to preserve sales figures after the economy suddenly slowed to a near halt. Rinkai, as a company, was never one to overextend and held out on developing a new model in the face of dwindling demand. However, with his company slowly but steadily heading towards insolvency, founder and CEO Yoshioki Ishii decided to betray his philosophy and build a unique car to stay afloat.

The resulting vehicle was the Tsuji (辻; junction), a kei-sized 5-door hatchback with a comparatively large 2-litre engine. Its internals were based on those of the Every’s humble 60 kW (81 hp) unit, but it was overhauled with current technologies such as fuel injection and a three-way catalytic converter, and tuned for optimal fuel efficiency. This new powerplant churned out 68 kW (98 hp) at a modest 5500 RPM.

Having been subject to a number of cost-cutting measures, the Tsuji lacked power steering, used front and rear drum brakes, and had removable, non-adjustable second-row seats. While clearly a marked departure from the ethos of the Rinkai Motor Company, it ultimately proved to be an affordable subcompact with enough power for a wide variety of uses inside and outside of Japan, and helped the company recover.

2.0
SPECS
Layout FF
Aspiration NA
Displacement 1999 cc
Peak Power 68 kW (91 hp) @ 5500 RPM
Peak Torque 156 Nm (115 ft-lb) @ 3400 RPM
Weight 775 kg (1708 lb)
Weight Distribution Front/Rear 62/38
STARTING PRICE
¥671,300 JDM
$6,200 USDM
COLOURS

Maroon

Marsh Green

Sky Blue

Snow Grey

#9
Rinkai JIKO '99
On the Rinkai Motor Company's 25th anniversary in early 1999, a special car was released to the public. While the automaker's previous offerings largely consisted of small jack-of-all-trades subcompacts, this new vehicle was a bona fide sports car with a tried-and-true MR drive layout. The JIKO's name translates to "self" (written in Japanese as 自己), but is also a play on "ji-go", or "two-five", referring to the twenty-five years over which Rinkai had been producing cars.

To minimize weight, the JIKO used a state-of-the-art carbon-fibre monocoque, carbon-fibre body panels, and a 2-litre engine with an aluminum-alloy block and head. Said engine was a turbocharged inline-four that produced 240 kW (322 hp) at 7500 RPM, resulting in a 0-100 time of 4.1 seconds. With its weight and suspension setup, the JIKO could pull 1.15 g in corners.

For such a unique and comparatively expensive car, the JIKO was not produced by hand, but rather mass-customized at a limited rate. While it cost much more than any prior Rinkai models, it still captured the spirit of the small Japanese brand well—especially when juxtaposed with the hottest Italian supercars of the time.

JIKO
SPECS
Layout MR
Aspiration TB
Displacement 1997 cc
Peak Power 240 kW (322 hp) @ 7500 RPM
Peak Torque 316 Nm (233 ft-lb) @ 6500 RPM
Weight 805 kg (1774 lb)
Weight Distribution Front/Rear 40/60
STARTING PRICE
¥3,650,000 JDM
$35,000 USDM
COLOURS

Ardour Red

Tangerine

Hornet Yellow

Vivid Green

Pacific Blue

Steel Blue

Ethereal White

Pewter Grey

Sumi Black

#10
Rinkai Fujisaki JIKO GT500 '99
In 1999, to celebrate its 25th anniversary, Rinkai released a midship-engine car known as the JIKO (自己; self). Its peak power output of 240 kW (322 hp) didn't sound like much compared to those of Modena's latest and greatest, but it more than made up for it with a weight of 805 kg (1774 lb) and specially-tuned suspension. Coinciding with the JIKO's release, Rinkai announced that it would be competing in the 1999 JGTS (Japanese Grand Touring Series) with a GT500-spec version of the JIKO.

The race car’s turbocharged two-litre engine had been modified to make almost 500 hp (373 kW), and 34 kg of weight was shaved off. Extensive aero upgrades allowed the car to generate well in excess of 400 kg (882 lb) of downforce at 290 kph (180 mph), while stiff race suspension allowed it to slingshot through corners with up to 2 g of force.

Rinkai’s works team, with tire manufacturer Fujisaki as a primary sponsor, entered two cars in the 1999 JGTS season. Car number 25 finished 2nd overall, signalling a bright future for Rinkai in motorsports as the new millennium approached.

JIKO GT500
SPECS
Layout MR
Aspiration TB
Displacement 1997 cc
Peak Power 370 kW (497 hp) @ 8400 RPM
Peak Torque 471 Nm (348 ft-lb) @ 7200 RPM
Weight 771 kg (1700 lb)
Weight Distribution Front/Rear 37/63
STARTING PRICE
N/A (development and production cost approx. ¥132,139,310/unit)
COLOURS

#25 Ethereal White/Pacific Blue/Tangerine

#26 Ethereal White/Pacific Blue/Tangerine

#11

With looks like that and performance to match, the Jiko would have been a shoo-in for Gran Turismo 2 - especially the GT500 version, which would either have been listed as a Special Model in the dealership or made available as a prize.

On top of that, its light weight and tunability would have made it a firm favorite among members of the infamous Midnight Club, and given it a strong chance of dominating the street racing scene.


#12
Shimizu Mont Blanc '67
Shimizu Heavy Industries was known for manufacturing many things, from electric locomotives to its trademark motorcycles. Thus, the company's first car was somewhat of a surprise, especially given that it was a luxury wagon with a 2.5-litre V8 under the hood.

With a specific dispacement of 312 cc per cylinder, the relatively small SOHC V8 was equipped with mechanical fuel injection—a technology that, despite being used in numerous American and European cars in the 1950s, was new to the Japanese market. It offered better and more consistent performance versus carbureted designs and was far more resistant to engine knock.

Compared to the majority of American cars, the Mont Blanc was just over 4 metres (around 13’) long with a wheelbase of 2.42 metres (roughly 8’), helping it maneuver more effectively through city streets. The car’s long roof also allowed the seats to be positioned further back, to preserve comfort without compromising cargo space. At a decent price, the Mont Blanc helped set a new standard for premium cars in Japan.

Mont Blanc
SPECS
Layout FR
Aspiration NA
Displacement 2496 cc
Peak Power 79 kW (106 hp) @ 5300 RPM
Peak Torque 197 Nm (145 ft-lb) @2500 RPM
Weight 1139 kg (2511 lb)
Weight Distribution Front/Rear 54/46
STARTING PRICE
¥365,000 JDM
$3,350 USDM
COLOURS

Deep Red

Cream

Alpine White

Grey Fog

Piano Black

#13
Shimizu Gran Paradiso '71
If you had money to spend on a prestigious supercar with a powerful engine, you went to the Italians. But for those who didn't need all that power or status, yet still wanted a sharply-dressed midship sports car with refined handling, the Shimizu Gran Paradiso from Japan was the perfect package.

Between the passenger compartment and the rear axle was a retooled version of the fuel-injected 2.5-litre V8 engine used in the Mont Blanc. It had new intake and exhaust manifolds and better internals, for a peak output of 121 kW (163 hp) over the Mont Blanc’s 79 kW (106 hp).

The Gran Paradiso had a top speed of 220 kph (137 mph) and could reach 100 kph (62 mph) from a standstill in 5.8 seconds. Even if such numbers were easily surpassed by the Italians, they were sufficient in establishing a car for the driver who didn’t have it all, nor needed it.

Gran Paradiso
SPECS
Layout MR
Aspiration NA
Displacement 2496 cc
Peak Power 121 kW (163 hp) @ 6400 RPM
Peak Torque 214 Nm (158 ft-lb) @ 4400 RPM
Weight 780 kg (1719 lb)
Weight Distribution Front/Rear 41/59
STARTING PRICE
¥625,000 JDM
$5,800 USDM
COLOURS

Deep Red

Fiery Orange

Summer Blue

Alpine White

Grey Fog

#14
Shimizu Matterhorn '78
Long, low, and luxurious, the Matterhorn was Shimizu's first limousine, created for an upper echelon of clients that included corporate executives and government officials. It had a four-litre inline-six engine sending respectable power to the rear wheels, useful for hauling the 1.6-tonne sedan around town.

The Matterhorn came standard with such features as double-wishbone suspension in both the front and rear, a 4-speed automatic transmission, adjustable full-grain leather seats, a microsuede-wrapped steering wheel, and plenty of sound-deadening insulation.

Adorned with just the right amount of chrome, the stately Matterhorn—in a similar manner as its namesake—rose to fame as one of the most prominent ultra-luxury cars of its time.

Matterhorn
SPECS
Layout FR
Aspiration NA
Displacement 3996 cc
Peak Power 140 kW (187 hp) @ 5400 RPM
Peak Torque 293 Nm (216 ft-lb) @ 2400 RPM
Weight 1641 kg (3618 lb)
Weight Distribution Front/Rear 55/45
STARTING PRICE
¥1,030,000 JDM
$9,500 USDM
COLOURS

Deep Red

Space Blue

Grey Fog

Piano Black
VIP Custom
SPECS
Layout FR
Aspiration NA
Displacement 3996 cc
Peak Power 140 kW (187 hp) @ 5400 RPM
Peak Torque 293 Nm (216 ft-lb) @ 2400 RPM
Weight 1749 kg (3856 lb)
Weight Distribution Front/Rear 54/46
STARTING PRICE
N/A (modification cost approx. ¥11,000)
COLOURS

Piano Black

#15

The minimalistic designs of the Gran Paradiso and Matterhorn would have been quite futuristic at the time of their respective debuts, but they would have been more easily accepted by the public in later years.


#16
Shimizu Lyskamm '87
Even if Shimizu's lineup was rather small—consisting of only a limousine and a mid-engined sports car—the marque enjoyed perennial sales throughout the 1970s. The supercar boom in the '80s, however, gave Shimizu what it really needed to make its mark on the automotive world.

Integral to the Shimizu Lyskamm was a twin-turbocharged 4-litre DOHC V8 producing a massive 370 kW (496 hp) and 559 Nm (412 ft-lb) of power and torque, respectively. As was the standard for top-tier performance cars at the time, the engine was positioned between the cockpit and rear axle in a rear-midship layout. Most cars with this configuration, however, were strictly performance vehicles, with little attention paid towards comfort. The Lyskamm, however, was quite different.

Described by some as half supercar and half grand tourer, the Lyskamm incorporated extensive use of acoustic measures, including a thicker firewall, as well as generously padded seats and all-wheel drive. To offset the increase in weight, a fibreglass body was used, resulting in a total weight of 1390 kg (3064 lb).

With a top speed of 315 kph (196 mph) and a 0-100 time of 4.1 seconds, the futuristic Lyskamm could be considered a forerunner of the modern hypercar. Having spent four years in development, it first entered the market in 1987, but quickly became a hit and outshone its European competitors.

Lyskamm
SPECS
Layout M4
Aspiration TB
Displacement 3990 cc
Peak Power 370 kW (496 hp) @ 6900 RPM
Peak Torque 559 Nm (412 ft-lb) @ 4500 RPM
Weight 1390 kg (3064 lb)
Weight Distribution Front/Rear 41/59
STARTING PRICE
¥5,500,000 JDM
$51,000 USDM
COLOURS

Fiery Red

Fiery Orange

Summer Blue

Space Blue

Titanium Bronze

Alpine White

Grey Fog

Piano Black

#17
Mizuiro Hikyaku '00
In March of 2000, Rinkai Motor Company announced that it would be buying out Japanese luxury automaker Shimizu Automotive, as part of an effort by both companies to focus on the triad of "fun, luxury, and value". The resulting merger created the Mizuiro Motor Company, which continued to sell rebranded Rinkai and Shimizu models as usual. Not long after, though, Mizuiro would launch its first car, the Hikyaku (飛脚; courier)—a wagon with various trim levels designed to cater to each of the company's "three points".

The base E model was powered by an 80 kW (108 hp) two-litre V6 and weighed 1346 kg (2967 lb), making it less of a performance vehicle than a practical, no-nonsense daily driver. The luxury-oriented L model used the same engine as the E, but was outfitted with an electronically controlled automatic transmission, all-wheel drive, electronic stability control, and a comfortable luxury interior.

The crown jewel of the Hikyaku trim levels, however, came in the form of the S. This performance-oriented variant was equipped with a 168 kw (226 hp) version of the standard 2.0 V6 mated to a five-speed sequential gearbox sending power to the rear wheels, as well as upgraded suspension and 71 kg (157 lb) of weight lost.

With the Hikyaku, Mizuiro served as an adequate successor to Rinkai and Shimizu, but their new car was only the beginning of a diverse series of vehicles designed to cater to many different markets.

E
SPECS
Layout FF
Aspiration TB
Displacement 1998 cc
Peak Power 80 kW (108 hp) @ 6000 RPM
Peak Torque 188 Nm (139 ft-lb) @ 2400 RPM
Weight 1346 kg (2967 lb)
Weight Distribution Front/Rear 55/45
STARTING PRICE
¥1,680,000 JDM
$16,000 USDM
COLOURS

Ardour Red

Steel Blue

Sandy Khaki

Steel Grey

Pewter Grey

Sumi Black
L
SPECS
Layout FF
Aspiration TB
Displacement 1998 cc
Peak Power 80 kW (108 hp) @ 6000 RPM
Peak Torque 188 Nm (139 ft-lb) @ 2400 RPM
Weight 1393 kg (3071 lb)
Weight Distribution Front/Rear 54/46
STARTING PRICE
¥2,032,000 JDM
$19,000 USDM
COLOURS

Ardour Red

Steel Blue

Sandy Khaki

Steel Grey

Pewter Grey

Sumi Black
S
SPECS
Layout FR
Aspiration TB
Displacement 1998 cc
Peak Power 168 kW (226 hp) @ 7400 RPM
Peak Torque 253 Nm (187 ft-lb) @ 5000 RPM
Weight 1275 kg (2811 lb)
Weight Distribution Front/Rear 51/49
STARTING PRICE
¥1,875,000 JDM
$17,500 USDM
COLOURS

Ardour Red

Steel Blue

Sandy Khaki

Steel Grey

Pewter Grey

Sumi Black

#18
Mizuiro Tenet '04
A first for the company, the Mizuiro Tenet was a large minivan with seating for seven occupants and a weight of over 1.6 tonnes. Its tall stature and gentle curves exuded an air of grandeur, backed up by a lofty interior and a comfortable ride.

Under the hood of the Tenet was a 2.5-litre V6 engine paired to a five-speed automatic transmission. Unusually for a minivan, it also had double-wishbone suspension in both the front and rear for smooth cornering.

For those in the market for a premium car with a low floor and a tall roof, the Tenet L trim level came standard with such amenities as a premium audio system with MP3 player support, electronic stability control, and tables that folded down from the backs of the front seats. The interior of the L was also changed in a crucial way; the third row was removed and the second row was moved far back for legroom surpassing even that of top-end luxury sedans.

Despite it having plenty of tricks up its sleeve, the Tenet failed to catch on amongst potential customers, mainly due to being a relatively dull, mundane offering from a company that had prided itself on fun, sporty vehicles.

E
SPECS
Layout FF
Aspiration NA
Displacement 2497 cc
Peak Power 100 kW (134 hp) @ 6400 RPM
Peak Torque 202 Nm (149 ft-lb) @ 3400 RPM
Weight 1510 kg (3329 lb)
Weight Distribution Front/Rear
STARTING PRICE
¥1,790,000 JDM
$16,400 USDM
COLOURS

Deep Velour

Light Steel Blue

Steel Blue

Steel Gold

Cloud Grey Metallic

Pewter Grey
L
SPECS
Layout FF
Aspiration NA
Displacement 2497 cc
Peak Power 100 kW (134 hp) @ 6400 RPM
Peak Torque 202 Nm (149 ft-lb) @ 3400 RPM
Weight 1509 kg (3327 lb)
Weight Distribution Front/Rear
STARTING PRICE
¥2,120,000 JDM
$19,400 USDM
COLOURS

Deep Velour

Light Steel Blue

Steel Blue

Steel Gold

Cloud Grey Metallic

Pewter Grey

Black Mist Metallic

#19

That would have made the Tenet more expensive to build than rivals - combined with the fact that it was out of character for the company, it would have been a guaranteed loss-maker in the day! Today, however, it would be seen as a curious, intriguing choice for those wanting a modern classic people mover.


#20
Mizuiro Hizoku '06
In 2003, development began on a lightweight mid-engine roadster intended to be Mizuiro's first true flagship car since the pre-merger Rinkai JIKO of 1999. Having been displayed at the 2005 Tokyo Motor Show and first produced in early 2006, the Hizoku (匪賊; bandit) had front and rear McPherson strut suspension, a bonded aluminum chassis, and a manually convertible hardtop roof.

Mated to a six-speed manual transmission was another refresh of Rinkai’s classic two-litre SOHC inline-four engine, this time with multi-point fuel injection and a turbocharger for a total output of 158 kW (212 hp). The base RS model’s low weight of 944 kg (2082 lb) gave it a top speed of 241 kph (150 mph) and cornering forces in excess of 0.94 g.

A limited-edition rally version called the RX was produced in 2007, receiving upgrades in the form of an offroad undertray, all-wheel drive with limited-slip differentials, lower fog lights, rally wheels, and lifted suspension. The engine and transmission were carried over from the RS model.

The Hizoku was no grand tourer, but it didn’t aim to be. Although sacrifices were made in terms of comfort, it proved to be a popular little car with an acceptable price tag.

RS
SPECS
Layout MR
Aspiration TB
Displacement 1999 cc
Peak Power 158 kW (212 hp) @ 6700 RPM
Peak Torque 252 Nm (186 ft-lb) @ 5600 RPM
Weight 944 kg (2082 lb)
Weight Distribution Front/Rear 38/62
STARTING PRICE
¥1,905,000 JDM
$17,750 USDM
COLOURS

Ardour Red

Tangerine

Legacy Sunset Orange

Candy Burnt Orange

Hornet Yellow

Vivid Green

Kuromatsu

Electric Blue

Pacific Blue

Legacy Coastal Blue

Sandy Khaki

Ethereal White

Steel Grey

Sumi Black
RX
SPECS
Layout MR
Aspiration TB
Displacement 1999 cc
Peak Power 158 kW (212 hp) @ 6700 RPM
Peak Torque 252 Nm (186 ft-lb) @ 5600 RPM
Weight 1009 kg (2224 lb)
Weight Distribution Front/Rear 39/61
STARTING PRICE
¥2,225,000 JDM
$21,000 USDM
COLOURS

Ardour Red

Tangerine

Legacy Sunset Orange

Candy Burnt Orange

Hornet Yellow

Vivid Green

Kuromatsu

Electric Blue

Pacific Blue

Legacy Coastal Blue

Sandy Khaki

Ethereal White

Steel Grey

Sumi Black

#21
Mizuiro Hizoku TC '07
Adapted from the Hizoku RS roadster, the Hizoku TC ("Touring Concept") was a one-off racing machine produced by Mizuiro. This specific model sported an extensive aero kit, wider tires, a large competition-spec rear wing, a limited-slip differential, and a six-speed sequential transmission in place of the standard manual. All of these enhancements, however, played second fiddle to an extensively overhauled engine, now producing 340 kW (456 hp), and a weight reduction of 51 kg (113 lb). The TC had a power-to-weight ratio of 0.333 kW/kg (0.203 hp/lb), comparable to those of contemporary exotic supercars.

While its road-going RS counterpart was built with driving pleasure in mind, the Hizoku TC was a machine focused on numbers, and as such, it was definitely not for the faint of heart.

TC
SPECS
Layout MR
Aspiration TB
Displacement 1999 cc
Peak Power 340 kW (456 hp) @ 7600 RPM
Peak Torque 456 Nm (337 ft-lb) @ 6600 RPM
Weight 896 kg (1975 lb)
Weight Distribution Front/Rear 36/64
STARTING PRICE
N/A (development and production cost approx. ¥79,331,683/unit)
COLOURS

Electric Blue/Ethereal White

#22
Mizuiro Kasui '09
The Kasui (河水; river water) served as Mizuiro's first sedan, as well as their first attempt to capitalize on the growing hybrid market. Despite its hybrid system making it one of the company's heavier cars, its weight of 1323 kg (2917 lb) was comparable to that of non-hybrid competitors.

The design of Mizuiro’s two-litre inline-four, dating back to 1974, was given a modern-day refresh and built from the ground up with an aluminum-alloy block and head as well as a DOHC valvetrain. Combined with an electric motor, the resulting hybrid powerplant was capable of 83 kW (111 hp) and 21 km/L (49 mpg US).

The Kasui, being a hybrid geared towards everyday use, was styled in a simple manner, with a faux lower grille to preserve aerodynamics, as well as an inconspicuous exhaust disguised as a vent on the bottom edge of the rear bumper. It was a premium car, with LED units in the headlights and taillights and electric power steering, among other amenities. The Kasui effectively projected an eco-friendly image through its understated appearance, but the way it handled—especially in spite of its relative lack of power—demonstrated that Mizuiro hadn’t lost its touch when it came to green cars.

H
SPECS
Layout F4
Aspiration HY
Displacement 1999 cc
Peak Power 83 kW (111 hp) @ 5200 RPM
Peak Torque 225 Nm (166 ft-lb) @ 2100 RPM
Weight 1323 kg (2917 lb)
Weight Distribution Front/Rear 55/45
STARTING PRICE
¥2,735,000 JDM
$25,250 USDM
COLOURS

Ardour Red

Deep Velour

Light Steel Blue

Serene Blue Metallic

Pacific Blue

Steel Blue

Sandy Khaki

Steel Gold

Katsuobushi

Ethereal White

Cloud Grey Metallic

Tungsten Grey

Pewter Grey

Black Mist Metallic

#23
Splash Mizuiro Kasui '09
At 1323 kg (2917 lb), the Mizuiro Kasui (河水; river water) compact hybrid sedan wasn't particularly heavy for a vehicle of its type. With its hybrid system producing 83 kW (111 hp), it wasn't particularly slow either. A recently formed tuning company by the name of Splash thought differently, however.

The Kasui’s hybrid system was removed and the engine was modified to make 137 kW (183 hp) over the standard car’s 83 kW (111 hp). Connected to the engine was a six-speed sequential transmission that replaced the six-speed automatic, routing power to the rear wheels through a limited-slip differential. New wheels, brakes, and shock absorbers were installed, the interior was stripped, and an undertray was added to improve aerodynamics. The car’s weight was brought down to 1030 kg (2271 lb), completing the package.

These specialized cars were only sold in Japan by Mizuiro, as Splash had the company’s full support.

Kasui
SPECS
Layout FR
Aspiration NA
Displacement 1999 cc
Peak Power 137 kW (183 hp) @ 7200 RPM
Peak Torque 200 Nm (148 ft-lb) @5000 RPM
Weight 1030 kg (2271 lb)
Weight Distribution Front/Rear 53/47
STARTING PRICE
¥4,820,000 JDM
COLOURS

Ardour Red

Tangerine

Legacy Sunset Orange

Serene Blue Metallic

Pacific Blue

Steel Blue

Steel Gold

Katsuobushi

Ethereal White

Cloud Grey Metallic

Pewter Grey

Black Mist Metallic

Sumi Black