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Scagliati Motori SpA - Serenity and Dominance. (Geneva 2019 Coverage)


#1

Company History

Scagliati Motori SpA was founded in 1946 by Amadeo Scagliati in Mirano, Italy (a small town just outside of Marghera, Italy, in the Veneto region), with the hopes of fulfilling his lifelong dream of building automobiles with his name on it. Hailing from a long line of merchants and craftsmen who made (and lost) their fortunes in and around Venice, Scagliati made it his mission to combine the finest in Venetian craftsmanship with the power and passion typical of Italian automobiles in his quest to build the best luxury and grand-touring automobiles in Europe.

Venice’s long history of trade and craftsmanship is woven into Scagliati’s ethos, right from the winged lion of St. Mark (long the traditional symbol of the Republic of Venice) found on the evocative emblem of the company, through the powerful engines (the V12 chief among them) and opulent interiors that have become the trademark of Scagliati cars.

The story of Scagliati is, like that of its founder, full of highs and lows; the brand grew quickly in the 1940s and 1950s, with appearances on the race track and the silver screen alike fueling the Scagliati mythos. This initial period of growth was followed by the heady days of the 1960s and 1970s, where the company merged cutting-edge technology and design with traditional craftsmanship, and could seemingly do no wrong in the eyes of the motoring public. Scagliati’s wild success between 1960 and 1975 gave way to a period of stagnation and ultimately decline, the company foundering after Amadeo Scagliati’s death in 1976, ending in bankruptcy in 1986. After a lengthy and often fraught search for a corporate white knight, the CMW Group purchased Scagliati in 1988, and immediately set about turning around the faded Italian marque, pumping new ideas and new money into the revival effort. By the mid 1990s, Scagliati’s fortunes turned around, the marque restored to its former glory and now arguably the crown jewel in the CMW Group’s vast transportation empire.


2017 La Serenissima T, Scagliati Motori’s top-of-the-line grand-touring car


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#2

1947 245 Serenissima - The First Scagliati.


Above: 1947 Scagliati 245 Serenissima n.001 (Courtesy Scagliati Museum)

The very first car that Amadeo Scagliati ever produced, the 245 Serenissima set the tone for what a Scagliati automobile should be - lightweight, luxurious and powerful. Powered by a 2940cc single-overhead cam V12 (the 245 designates the number of cubic centimetres of displacement each cylinder provides), the 245 Serenissima was a breathtaking sight to behold on the streets and backroads of post-war Italy. The car immediately caught the attention of Allied soldiers stationed in Italy, some of whom were able to purchase 245s themselves, while others spotted an opportunity to make money selling the cars elsewhere, both in the rest of Europe and abroad.

The 245 Serenissima was powered by a completely bespoke V12 engine designed by Amadeo Scagliati and his team of engineers. The so-called Scalzano engine first appeared with a brace of six SU-type carburetors in the 245 “Sei”, producing 184 horsepower at 5600 RPM, and revving all the way to 6000 RPM. The all-cast iron engine, with single overhead camshafts and four valves per cylinder (a nod to the aircraft engines Scagliati designed before the war), was a compact but heavy motor that offered considerable room for growth in future models, a major factor explaining why the Scalzano engine remained in production for 17 years, until it was replaced by the Mirano V12 in 1964. This motor, combined with the 245’s lightweight, hand-beaten aluminum body, was sufficient to propel the 1195-kilogram car to 100 kilometres per hour in 9.8 seconds, and on to a top speed of 211 kilometres per hour, all while enjoying the finest luxury that Venice could offer in the interior.

Within six months of Serenissima n.001 rolling off the production line, Scagliati had sold fifty cars, recuperating most of his investment and providing the impetus for further development of the 245. Production of the 245 proceeded in parallel with 245 Veneto coupe, launched shortly after the Serenissima, (and will be the subject of a later article), with production ceasing in 1950 after a total of 177 Serenissimas rolled out of the workshop.


#3

Nice start man!

could you perhaps provide more screenshots, and maybe cropped? Can’t see much from here ^^


#4

This is pretty damn good, and I like it. BUT, and don’t take this the wrong way. This car looks exactly as expected. There are no risky design choices, which could make this car REALLY stand out, and I’m not talking “LED headlights” just non standard ideas. I recall TurboJ making a 356 body with headlights way low, like at the bumper level, and it looked freaking weird and cool at the same time. Maybe take more risks to really make the designs unique?


#5

Yeah it does look “basic” (not in a bad way, well kinda, but its not ugly or anything XD)


#6

I appreciate the feedback (and I quite like your designs too, by the way!)

There will be cars in this company with much more bold design language - especially in the 1960s and 70s, when Italian design was arguably in its heyday in reality, but this design is, like the first cars of most real companies, a little bit more on the conservative side of things. Expect the design language to grow and develop into something really unique as newer and more models start to come out. And, like a real company, there will almost certainly be some not-so-good designs too along the way - this is as much about telling a story as it is showcasing designs!

Further to that, since it was a big deal in the automotive industry up until the late 1970s or so, there may be some coachbuilding opportunities pop up from time to time…


#7

More shots of the 245 Serenissima:

The coupe sibling of the Serenissima, the Veneto, will be coming soon!


#8

niceee


#9

Love the rear!


#10

Scagliati History, Part 2: 1947-1951 Scagliati 245 Veneto



1947 Scagliati 245 Veneto in Rosso Veneto (courtesy Scagliati Museum)

The coupe variant of the Serenissima, the Veneto (so-named for the city of Venice), was developed in parallel by Scagliati. Sportier in character than its open-top sibling, the Veneto was a true four-season car for the discerning motorist, and also served as the basis for the very first forays into motorsport as well. Launched only a couple of months after the Serenissima, the Veneto shared all of its underpinnings with its sibling, the only differences being slightly different gear ratios in the four-speed manual gearbox to take advantage of the more aerodynamic body shape and a lower curb weight of 1093 kilograms, about a hundred kilograms less than the Serenissima.


Scagliati 245 Veneto rear quarter detail view (courtesy Scagliati Museum)


Production of the 245 Veneto ran concurrently with the 245 Serenissima, with 196 examples rolling out of the workshops in Mirano between 1947 and 1951. Like its sibling, the Veneto was a very expensive car for the time - one of the most expensive on the road, in fact - but, it found favour with the rich and famous, as well as a few enterprising racing drivers who found that the Veneto especially made a very good racing car indeed, something that Amadeo Scagliati noticed very early in the development of both cars, and would capitalise on going forward…



Specifications

Engine Specs 245 Serenissima 245 Veneto
Engine Scagliati Scalzano V12
Desciption 60-degree V12, cast-iron block and cylinder heads; cast pistons, rods and crankshaft
Valvetrain single overhead cam, 4-valves per cylinder
Displacement 2940 cubic centimetres
Aspriation six single-barrel carburetors, single high-performance filter element
Compression Ratio 9.8:1
Output 184 horsepower @ 5600 RPM, 179 ft-lb @ 5200 RPM
Redline 6000 RPM

Chassis Specs 245 Serenissima 245 Veneto
Layout front-engine, rear-wheel drive convertible front-engine, rear-wheel drive coupe
Seating driver + one passenger, premium seating
Chassis/Body Steel spaceframe chassis, hand-formed aluminium body
Suspension double-wishbone front and rear
Driveline 4-speed manual gearbox, open differential
Brakes front and rear drum brakes, 250mm diameter
Curb Weight 1195 kg 1093 kg
Weight Distribution 56%F/44%R 55%F/45%R
0-100 km/h 9.8s 9.6s
Top Speed 211 km/h 215 km/h
100-0 Braking Distance 68.5 m 68.3 m
List Price, New $15900 $15600
Production Run 1947-1950 1947-1951
Examples Produced 177 196

#11

#ripTurboJ


#12

With designs like those, it’s no wonder the company should be off to a great start!


#13

Serenity, Redefined. The 2018 Scagliati La Serenissima.

music at the reveal event:






Scagliati Motori SpA is proud to present the 2018 La Serenissima, the finest luxury grand touring automobile in the world. Born from over seven decades of building some of the finest automobiles on the planet, the La Serenissima incorporates the rich history of Venetian craftsmanship with cutting edge technology to produce a driving experience like no other.


SCALE Architecture - Lean, Mean And Green.

For the first time in our history, Scagliati has developed and deployed an all-carbon fibre architecture for one of our grand touring cars. Developed in close assocation with CMW Aerospace, the Scagliati Carbon-Fiber Automobile, Longitudinal Extensible architecture, or SCALE for short, provides unmatched stiffness and rigidity, making this the safest Scagliati ever built, earning the very highest marks in passenger protection, while at the same time saving a considerable amount of weight - as much as 220 kilograms - over its predecessors. SCALE provides a flexible and versatile architecture that will eventually underpin all Scagliatis well into the future, across all model lines. This weight savings, combined with the aerodynamic design and more efficient engine lineup, means that the La Serenissima achieves an official fuel economy rating of 11.6 L/100km in the Automation Unified Fuel Economy Standard, the most efficient V12 grand touring automobile from Scagliati to date.

The flexibility of the SCALE architecture allows Scagliati to unify their flagship two- and four-door grand touring models as one model for the very first time in our history, helping to ensure that nothing but the best possible automobiles leave our state-of-the-art factory.



Amadeo Modular Engine - Powering The Future.

New for 2018 is the Scagliati Amadeo family of engines. Named after our company’s founder, the Amadeo engine architecture can be used in six, eight and twelve cylinder models, providing the foundation for all future Scagliati cars. All Amadeo engines will share common elements; a sixty-degree vee-spacing with common bore spacings and deck heights, two turbochargers with intercooling and direct fuel injection, along with variable valve timing and lift to produce maximum power, yet returning superior driving dynamics and fuel efficiency. Compared to the outgoing Girotto V12, the Amadeo V12, as found in the La Serenissima and La Serenissima QP, produces more horsepower and torque over a much wider rev range, all while reducing fuel consumption by as much as five percent.

The Amadeo engine family has considerable headroom for both growth and tuning, with the base 5-litre V12 available in both 651-horsepower and 718-horsepower versions, the latter of which powering the sporty La Serenissima T and TF versions. Future growth has been built into the Amadeo engines, as well as the capability to be combined with electric hybridisation and other technologies to further improve efficiency and the driving experience alike.


Scagliati Pro-Active Supension - Harnessing The Fury.

Power is nothing without control, and we at Scagliati have gone to great lengths to ensure our cars are refined and sumptuous over the road, all while retaining the sporting character that has defined Scagliatis from the very first. Double wishbone front suspension and an advanced, multi-link rear suspension, combined with active ride control and electronic anti-roll bars, ensure that the La Serenissima can handle even the most demanding of pilots and road conditions with ease. Carbon ceramic brakes front and rear provide repeated safe and controllable stops from the La Serenissima’s top speed of 330 kilometres per hour, and work in conjunction with the active suspension and the seven-speed dual clutch gearbox as the cornerstones of the CAST (Corsa, Attivo, Stradale, Tempo) system, providing advanced stability, traction and launch control to all La Serenissimas. Finishing off the look and feel of the La Serenissima are the standard seven-spoke, 20-inch, optional fifteen-spoke 20-inch or optional dual-five-spoke 21-inch wheels, wearing high-performance tires as standard or ultra-high-performance tires as optional.




Interior - Serenity, Defined.

As with all Scagliati automobiles, the La Serenissima rewards lucky owners with a sumptuous and serene driving experience. The interior can be covered in a wide range of materials, from the finest of Italian leathers, chosen for their softness and uniformity of grain, to the most cutting-edge sustainable interior coverings, in any colour and combination that the owner desires. The accent materials are chosen to complement the textiles, selected from a range of wood with various treatments, several metals in multiple finishes as well as our unique machined and hand-polished carbon-fiber forgings. All of these fine materials are nothing, however, without the fastidious attention to detail afforded by our team of expert craftsmen and women, working in the finest traditions of centuries of Venetian artisans, who put a combined 150 man-hours into each interior.

Technology is front and center for the pilot in the La Serenissima, with a 2500-watt, 22-speaker Losconi audio system as standard in all models, as well as an advanced head-up display incorporating a synthetic vision system developed with the help of CMW Aerospace. Using a pair of infrared sensors integrated into each headlight housing, the Scagliati Enhanced Vision Environment, or SEVE for short, provides a stereoscopic, panoramic view ahead of the car projected in real-time on the windscreen, able to see up to ten times further than the human eye, and augmented by motion detection algorithms to highlight pedestrians or animals ahead. Wireless connectivity is standard in the La Serenissima, allowing for up to eight devices to connect to the car’s built-in hotspot, and allows for streaming or screencasting from both Android and Apple devices to either of the three screens found inside the car; one built into the centre dash, the other two built into the seat backs for rear passengers.

The technology extends to the driving experience as well, with the familiar Scagliati CAST (Corsa, Attivo, Stradale, Tempo) drive mode selector on the steering wheel switching between shift modes for the seven-speed dual-clutch gearbox, supension modes as well as configuring the TFT instrument panel and head-up display to provide exactly the information the pilot needs when and where they need it. The La Serenissima incorporates a valet mode, operated from the Smart Key, able to park the car or pull out of a tight space autonomously without the pilot needing to be present inside, and a traffic assist function in the adaptive cruise control can maintain lane presence and spacing at speeds of up to 30 kilometres per hour in heavy traffic.





Engine Specifications
Engine Type Scagliati Amadeo S050.653 V12
Description 60-degree V12, aluminium-silicon block and heads, forged crankshaft, rods and pistons
Valvetrain 4-valves per cylinder, variable valve lift and timing
Bore x Stroke 83.0mm x 77.1mm
Displacement 5000cc
Aspiration twin-turbocharged and intercooled, direct fuel injection
Compression Ratio 9.8:1
Output 651 horsepower @ 7800 RPM, 518 ft-lb @ 4100 RPM
Redline 8500 RPM

Model Specifications La Serenissima La Serenissima QP
Layout Front-engine, rear-wheel drive coupe front-engine, rear-wheel drive sedan
Seating Four -
Chassis/Body Carbon-fiber monocoque, aluminium panels -
Suspension double-wishbone front, multi-link rear -
Driveline 7-speed double clutch transmission, electronic limited-slip differential -
Brakes carbon-ceramic front and rear -
Curb Weight 2156 kilograms 2165 kilograms
Weight Distribution 56.8%F/43.2%R 56.7%F/43.3%R
0-100 km/h 4.2s -
100-0 Braking Distance 30.2m -
Top Speed 330 km/h* -
Fuel Economy 11.6 litres/100km -
List Price $201,790 $203,150

*Top speed is electronically limited



2018 Scagliati La Sernenissima T and TF - Power Over All.


For those demanding a more thrilling driving exprience, Scagliati has the answer in the all-new 2018 La Serenissima T and TF models. Picking up where the La Serenissima leaves off, the Serenissima T (coupe) and TF (sedan) combines a more power, a much more sporting character with a lightweight interior designed to both coddle and support the pilot while saving roughly 110 kilograms over the base La Serenissima. A more aggressive front-end treatment, quadruple exhaust outlets, satin-finished 21-inch double-five spoke wheels and carbon fiber trim all around the car in place of the traditional Scagliati brightwork signifies the no-nonsense manner of the T and TF models, and helps provide better cooling and aerodynamic stability.



Wider front wheels, along with ultra-high-performance tires, gives dramatically improved handling in conjunction with upsized carbon brakes and more aggressive suspension and CAST settings. The Amadeo V12 engine goes up from 651 to 718 horsepower, thanks to a redesigned intake and turbochargers, giving the car the ability to sprint from 0 to 100 kilometres per hour in 4.0 seconds, and on to an unlimited top speed of 371 kilometres per hour, making this the fastest production Scagliati ever. Most crucially, however, is that the fundamental character of the La Serenissima is unchanged in this model, with the car supremely comfortable, easy to drive and remarkably efficient for such a vehicle.

Engine Specifications
Engine Type Scagliati Amadeo S050.657 V12
Description 60-degree V12, aluminium-silicon block and heads, forged crankshaft, rods and pistons
Valvetrain 4-valves per cylinder, variable valve lift and timing
Bore x Stroke 83.0mm x 77.1mm
Displacement 5000cc
Aspiration twin-turbocharged and intercooled, direct fuel injection
Compression Ratio 9.8:1
Output 718 horsepower @ 8300 RPM, 533 ft-lb @ 4300 RPM
Redline 8800 RPM

Model Specifications La Serenissima T La Serenissima TF
Layout Front-engine, rear-wheel drive coupe front-engine, rear-wheel drive sedan
Seating Four -
Chassis/Body Carbon-fiber monocoque, aluminium panels -
Suspension double-wishbone front, multi-link rear -
Driveline 7-speed double clutch transmission, electronic limited-slip differential -
Brakes carbon-ceramic front and rear -
Curb Weight 2043 kilograms 2051 kilograms
Weight Distribution 57.3%F/42.7%R -
0-100 km/h 3.9s -
100-0 Braking Distance 28.2m 28.6m
Top Speed 371 km/h -
Fuel Economy 11.6 litres/100km -
List Price $238,450 $239,590

Uncompromising. The 2018 Scagliati La Serenissima V8.

We at Scagliati realise that efficiency is a key factor in the decision-making process of many of our valued customers, and we are very aware that we must take an active role in preserving our planet for future generations. At the same time, Scagliatis must all carry on the tradition of supreme luxury and exciting driving dynamics, which is why we are proud to present the 2018 La Serenissima V8 and QP V8.

We have leveraged the Amadeo Modular engine family to produce a compact, efficient, 60-degree turbocharged V8 of 3.33 litres displacement, producing 479 horsepower at 8200 RPM and 358 foot-pounds of torque at 5400 RPM. With this engine in the La Serenissima, it can sprint from 0 to 100 kilometres per hour in 4.5 seconds and up to its limited top speed of 330 kilometres per hour, while returning a combined 10.0 L/100km and 232 grams of CO2 per kilometre. A considerable weight savings from the smaller engine further adds to the driving experience of the La Serenissima V8, with under 54 percent of the car’s total weight over the front axle.

Inside the La Serenissima V8, you will find exactly the same interior as in its V12-powered siblings, with absolutely no compromise made in the comfort or refinement of the car. All of the quality and attention to detail expected from a Scagliati can be found in the La Serenissima V8, rest assured.

Engine Specifications
Engine Type Scagliati Amadeo S060.653 V8
Description 60-degree V8, aluminium-silicon block and heads, forged crankshaft, rods and pistons
Valvetrain 4-valves per cylinder, variable valve lift and timing
Bore x Stroke 83.0mm x 77.1mm
Displacement 3333cc
Aspiration twin-turbocharged and intercooled, direct fuel injection
Compression Ratio 9.9:1
Output 479 horsepower @ 8200 RPM, 358 ft-lb @ 5400 RPM
Redline 8800 RPM

Model Specifications La Serenissima V8 La Serenissima QP V8
Layout Front-engine, rear-wheel drive coupe front-engine, rear-wheel drive sedan
Seating Four -
Chassis/Body Carbon-fiber monocoque, aluminium panels -
Suspension double-wishbone front, multi-link rear -
Driveline 7-speed double clutch transmission, electronic limited-slip differential -
Brakes carbon-ceramic front and rear -
Curb Weight 2005 kilograms 2014 kilograms
Weight Distribution 53.8%F/46.2%R -
0-100 km/h 4.5s -
100-0 Braking Distance 29.8 m -
Top Speed 330 km/h* -
Fuel Economy 10.0 litres/100km -
List Price $174,560 $175,680

*Top speed is electronically limited


2017 Tokyo Motor Show
#14

Scagliati History, Part 3 - 1950-1957 Serenissima and Veneto Lineup

Gaining Traction - 1950/51 245 Serenissima Turismo and Veneto S

The initial success of the Serenissima roadster and the Veneto coupe buoyed the confidence of Amadeo Scagliati, who set about improving both cars over the course of their production run. Additionally, owners of the first Serenissimas and Venetos found that they were both very good race cars in their own right, and it convinced Scagliati that it might be a worthwhile exercise to build dedicated race versions as a marketing exercise.


1950 Scagliati 245 Serenissima Turismo, in Azzuro Laguna Mettallica

1951 Scagliati 245 Veneto S, in Giallo Solare

The first major revision of the Serenissima family arrived in late 1950, with the debut of the 245 Serenissima Turismo and the 245 Veneto S shortly after in early 1951. Most of the changes were incremental improvements; the trim lines of the new cars were changed from the original model, and the front grille was slightly reproportioned. Inside the Turismo and Veneto S, Scagliati remedied the biggest complaint about the original Serenissima and Veneto, that being the interior quality being marginal at best. With a newly-hired team of leatherworkers and finish carpenters, the company finished the Turismo and Veneto S with the finest leathers and wood they could get their hands on, and the results were well-received by the press and paying customer alike.

Under the skin, the Scalzano V12 retained its displacement, but the finicky and inefficient single-barrel carburetors were replaced by a trio of double-barrel carbs. This updated engine, the 245 Triplo, allowed the compression ratio to increase to 10.2:1, boosting horsepower by ten over the original 245 Sei, all the while improving efficiency and reliability considerably. The addition of two-cylinder drum brakes front and rear dramatically improved the car’s braking performance, which in the original Serenissima and Veneto could be considered marginal at best even among its contemporaries. Even with the increase in price necessitated by all the improvements made, the Serenissima Turismo and Veneto S still managed to sell in greater numbers than the first-generation Serenissimas, as a brace of new Italian film stars in the country’s resurgent film industry found the Serenissima Tursimo especially to be an essential accessory to one’s newfound fame, helping to propel the company from a quiet little garage manufacturer into a brand desired by all.

Specifications

Engine Specs 245 Serenissima Turismo 245 Veneto S
Engine Scagliati Scalzano 245 Triplo
Desciption 60-degree V12, cast-iron block and cylinder heads; cast pistons, rods and crankshaft
Valvetrain single overhead cam, 2-valves per cylinder
Displacement 2940 cubic centimetres
Aspriation three two-barrel carburetors, single high-performance filter element
Compression Ratio 10.2:1
Output 194 horsepower @ 5800 RPM, 183 ft-lb @ 5100 RPM
Redline 6200 RPM

Chassis Specs 245 Serenissima Turismo 245 Veneto S
Layout front-engine, rear-wheel drive convertible front-engine, rear-wheel drive coupe
Seating driver + one passenger, luxury seating
Chassis/Body Steel spaceframe chassis, hand-formed aluminium body
Suspension double-wishbone front and rear
Driveline 4-speed manual gearbox, open differential
Brakes front and rear two-cylinder drum brakes, 250mm diameter
Curb Weight 1218 kg 1122 kg
Weight Distribution 56%F/44%R 55%F/45%R
0-100 km/h 9.5s 8.3s
Top Speed 211 km/h 216 km/h
100-0 Braking Distance 59.9 m 55.5 m
List Price, New $18850 $18590
Production Run 1950-1954 1951-1954
Examples Produced 238 315

Prima Corsa - 1950 255 Serenissima S and 1951 265 Veneto Corsa

1950 also saw Scagliati dip their toe into motor racing for the first time, with the 255 Serenissima S. Taking the basic 245 Serenissima Tursimo, Scagliati engineers stripped out most of the creature comforts of the road car, making improvements to the car’s brakes, aerodynamics and suspension at the same time. Nothing was overlooked in the chase to save weight; the internal hood hinges and release mechanisms were replaced by a lighter, simpler set of external hinges and straps, while most of the chrome in the car was deleted as well. The front indicators were replaced by a set of high-intensity beams, though these were quickly found to be inadequate for sustained high-speed driving at night.


1950 Scagliati 255 Serenissima S, in Bronzo Mettallica

Under the hood, the Scalzano V12 was bored out from 72.5 millimetres to 74, taking displacement to 3063 cubic centimetres from the orignal 2940. With the improved fuel delivery cribbed from the revised road cars, along with a set of more aggressive exhaust headers helping the engine breathe better, horsepower went from 194 to 222, while the torque went from 183 foot-pounds to 202, with the engine breathing better at higher RPM than ever before.

The 255 Serenissima S was, unfortunately, not particularly successful from a sales or racing perspective; only seventeen were built, and while one Serenissima S managed to finish third in class at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1950, that was arguably the most success this particular model achieved. Scagliati realised that this car was not as competitive as they had hoped, and treated the Serenissima S as a testbed for later racing efforts, taking the feedback from teams and drivers and incorporating it into their next racing effort, the 1951 Veneto Corsa.


1951 Veneto Corsa, in Nero Spazio

For the 1951 racing season, Scagliati took the hard lessons learned with the Serenissima S and incorporated them into a new race car, the 265 Veneto Corsa. Starting with the 245 Veneto S road car, Scagliati did much the same to the Corsa as it did to the Serenissima S, stripping out the extraneous weight, improving brakes, tires and suspension and tweaking the car’s aerodynamics. The improved stiffness of the Veneto body, along with the coupe’s naturally better aerodynamics, helped dramatically improve top speed, handling and acceleration. Additionally, drivers found the car to be much more comfortable over long races, in spite of their initial misgivings about safety and ease of egress in the event of an emergency.


The headlights of the Veneto Corsa were dramatically improved over the Serenissima S, having been replaced by yellow-lensed high-intensity beams. Combined with the small beams that carried over from the Serenissima S, this finally proved to be more than adequate for high-speed night racing. The finicky and troublesome hood straps were improved by a pair of quick-release buckles, making engine access easier and faster, and helping to keep the hood in place at speeds approaching 240 kilometres per hour. The addition of an automatic locking differential, a first for any Scagliati, dramatically improved traction and handling of the 265 Veneto Corsa.

In the quest for ever-increasing speed, the Scalzano engine was further enlarged, bored and stroked to 3178 cubic centimetres, good for 244 horsepower and 210 foot-pounds of torque. Improvements were made in the casting process of the rotating assembly, allowing the engine to rev higher than ever before, and tweaks were made to the fuel delivery to allow more reliable operation, and a set of hand-made exhaust headers further improved the engine.

The 265 Veneto Corsa met with far more success than the 255 Serenissima S, with thirty-eight examples being built, winning their classes at such prestigious races as the 12 Hours of Sebring and the Targa Florio, as well as numerous smaller races across Europe and North America, increasing the brand’s presence and mystique in the process.

Specifications

Engine Specs 255 Serenissima S 265 Veneto Corsa
Engine Scagliati Scalzano 255 Triplo Corsa Scagliati Scalzano 265 Corsa
Desciption 60-degree V12, cast-iron block and cylinder heads; cast pistons, rods and crankshaft
Valvetrain single overhead cam, 2-valves per cylinder
Displacement 3063 cubic centimetres 3178 cubic centimetres
Aspriation three two-barrel carburetors, racing intake
Compression Ratio 10.2:1 10.6:1
Output 222 horsepower @ 5900 RPM, 202 ft-lb @ 5600 RPM 244 horsepower @ 6200 RPM, 210 ft-lb @5700 RPM
Redline 6500 RPM 6800 RPM

Chassis Specs 255 Serenissima S 255 Veneto Corsa
Layout front-engine, rear-wheel drive convertible front-engine, rear-wheel drive coupe
Seating driver + one passenger, basic seating
Chassis/Body Steel spaceframe chassis, hand-formed aluminium body
Suspension double-wishbone front and rear
Driveline 4-speed manual gearbox, open differential 4-speed manual gearbox, automatic locking differential
Brakes front and rear two-cylinder drum brakes, 250mm diameter
Curb Weight 1186 kg 1077 kg
Weight Distribution 56%F/44%R 55%F/45%R
0-100 km/h 9.4s 7.3s
Top Speed 220 km/h 234 km/h
100-0 Braking Distance 56.5 m 51.0 m
List Price, New $14200 $20550
Production Run 1950 1951-1954
Examples Produced 17 38

1954 285 Turismo and Veneto GTS


1954 Scagliati 285 Veneto GTS, in Titanio Mettallica

1954 Scagliati 285 Turismo, in Verde Como

Scagliati launched the ultimate version of the Serenissima family in 1954, just as the company started to reach the limitations of the car’s now seven-year old chassis. Engine cooling, long a weakness in the Serenissima and the Veneto, was improved with the addition of the so-called “branchie” or “gills”, a feature that was to become prominent on Scagliatis well into the future. Taking a cue from the race cars, a set of yellow-lensed high-intensity driving lights became standard on these final models as well, as their speed started to approach that of the race cars just three years earlier. The locking differential too found its way into the road cars, improving the handling and traction in both coupe and roadster.

In response to feedback from Serenissima and Veneto owners, Scagliati introduced an integrated reverse light into each light fixture as well, a feature that no doubt prevented many accidents that damaged a good number of the first two generations of the Serenissima family. Chromed wire wheels made their first appearance in the 285s, imparting an improved sense of road presence in the car.

Under the hood the Scalzano V12 remained, with the bore and stroke increasing to 75.5 millimetres by 63.7 millimetres, taking total displacement to 3420 cubic centimetres. Breathing through an all-new set of six Weber DCOE carburetors, the 285 Sei, as this engine was designated, produced a hefty 234 horsepower and 220 foot-pounds of torque, very nearly as much as the 265 Veneto Corsa race car three years prior. Sales were brisk, with more 285 Turismos and Veneto GTSes being built than any Scagliati to date, helping provide the funds for Scagliati to develop not only the Serenissima’s replacement, but also consider branching out into new market segments as well…

Specifications

Engine Specs 285 Turismo 285 Veneto GTS
Engine Scagliati Scalzano 285 Sei
Desciption 60-degree V12, cast-iron block and cylinder heads; cast pistons, rods and crankshaft
Valvetrain single overhead cam, 2-valves per cylinder
Displacement 3420 cubic centimetres
Aspriation six downdraft-style carburetors, single high-performance filter element
Compression Ratio 10.3:1
Output 234 horsepower @ 5800 RPM, 220 ft-lb @ 4900 RPM
Redline 6200 RPM

Chassis Specs 285 Turismo 285 Veneto GTS
Layout front-engine, rear-wheel drive convertible front-engine, rear-wheel drive coupe
Seating driver + one passenger, luxury seating
Chassis/Body Steel spaceframe chassis, hand-formed aluminium body
Suspension double-wishbone front and rear
Driveline 4-speed manual gearbox, automatic locking differential
Brakes front and rear two-cylinder drum brakes, 250mm diameter
Curb Weight 1238 kg 1138 kg
Weight Distribution 56%F/44%R 55%F/45%R
0-100 km/h 8.0s 7.0s
Top Speed 223 km/h 229 km/h
100-0 Braking Distance 50.1 m 47.0 m
List Price, New $20150 $19760
Production Run 1954-1957 1954-1957
Examples Produced 357 402

Racing Royalty: 1954 295 Veneto CS “La Dominante”


1954 Scagliati 295 Veneto CS “La Dominante”, in Azzuro Navale

While the 265 Veneto Corsa of 1951 was a very successful car in its own right on the track, the one great victory Scagliati remained out of their reach; the 24 Hours of Le Mans. In 1954, the company decided to go all-out in their chase for the crown, by building a small run of very specially prepared Venetos with the express purpose of winning that year’s race. No expense was spared in the construction of these cars, designated as the 295 Veneto CS. Every ounce of extraneous weight was stripped from the car, to the point that even the hood straps and hinges of the previous race cars were removed in place of locking pins, saving weight and improving the car’s aerodyamics. Reprofiled headlights, in black metal housings, improved illumination and aerodynamics, while the wider fenders front and rear accommodated larger racing tires.

Under the skin, the 285 Sei engine was bored out even further, and with the shorter stroke crank from the 265 Veneto Corsa, took the engine to 3547 cubic centimetres of displacement. Improvements to production processes and machining allowed the new engine to rev to 6900 RPM and produce 284 horsepower and 240 foot-pounds of torque. Combined with the car’s 1095 kilogram curb weight, this allowed the 295 Veneto CS to accelerate faster than any Scagliati to date, sprinting to 100 kilometres per hour in an astonishing 6.9 seconds.

Scagliati showed up at Le Mans in 1954 with one mission - win the race. After a challenging start, the two Scagliatis chipped away at Mercedes and Jaguar, taking the lead of the race as the sun came up, and holding on for a first, second and fourth-place finish overall. The Veneto CS continued on to keep winning races all over Europe, earning the nickname “La Dominante”, one of the historic nicknames of the city of Venice, as it took victory after victory that year. Only two Veneto CSes survive today; one in the Scagliati Museum, and one in the hands of a private collector, which changed hands at an auction in 2016 for $22.6 million, making it the most expensive Scagliati ever.

Specifications

Engine Specs 295 Veneto CS “La Dominante”
Engine Scagliati Scalzano 295 Corsa
Desciption 60-degree V12, cast-iron block and cylinder heads; cast pistons, rods and crankshaft
Valvetrain single overhead cam, 2-valves per cylinder
Displacement 3547 cubic centimetres
Aspriation six downdraft-style carburetors, racing intake
Compression Ratio 10.6:1
Output 284 horsepower @ 6400 RPM, 240 ft-lb @ 6000 RPM
Redline 6200 RPM

Chassis Specs 295 Veneto CS “La Dominante”
Layout front-engine, rear-wheel drive coupe
Seating driver + one passenger, basic seating
Chassis/Body Steel spaceframe chassis, hand-formed aluminium body
Suspension double-wishbone front and rear
Driveline 4-speed manual gearbox, automatic locking differential
Brakes front and rear two-cylinder drum brakes, 250mm diameter
Curb Weight 1095 kg
Weight Distribution 56%F/44%R
0-100 km/h 6.9s
Top Speed 246 km/h
100-0 Braking Distance 40.6 m
List Price, New $24600
Production Run 1954-1955
Examples Produced 7

#15

SPY SHOT: Sporty Scagliati On The Way To Los Angeles?

Our spy photographers caught a glimpse of what appears to be a new variant of the Scagliati La Serenissima this afternoon being loaded into a trailer for shipping, presumably heading to the Los Angeles Auto Show next week. Details are scarce, but the swollen rear wheel arches and aerodynamic enhancements point to a more sport-focussed version of the La Serenissima. If this is in fact true, we will have full coverage of this car next week!


#16

the La Dominante is great.


#17

In their most potent road-going forms, the Serenissima (and its hardtop sibling, the Veneto) would quite easily have been supercars even before the term had officially been coined.

As for the current La Serenissima, it can be summed up in four words: I. Want. One. Now. It doesn’t matter what trim it is; the whole range is simply mind-blowing!


#18

To Places Unconquered - Introducing the 2019 Scagliati Cinquetorri.

Music for the unveiling:


2019 Scagliati Cinquetorri in Rosso Amarone


2019 Scagliati Cinquetorri L in Espresso Mettallica

2019 Scagliati Cinquetorri LS in Viola Reale

For the 2019 model year, Scagliati is proud to present the Cinquetorri, a ground-up re-imagining of what an ultra-luxury SUV should be. Named after Cinque Torri, an unmistakable mountain that towers over the famous resort town of Cortina d’Amprezzo, nestled in the Dolomite Mountains just a short journey from the Scagliati headquarters, the Cinquetorri brings the strong presence and sharp lines of the design language that debuted on the La Serenissima and combines it with rugged design to create an SUV of peerless design and presence.


2019 Scagliati Cinquetorri in Viola Reale


SCALE Architecture - Unyielding Strength

The Cinquetorri is the second vehicle to be built from Scagliati’s pioneering SCALE architecture, which brings to bear the incredible strength and lightness of carbon-fibre construction to produce a lightweight, rugged vehicle with incredible safety - the Cinquetorri exceeds all government safety ratings, all while weighing almost 200 kilograms less than the outgoing Regata SUV. Inside, the careful design of the chassis reduces noise levels dramatically over the outgoing Regata, in some cases by as much as 70 percent.


2019 Scagliati Cinquetorri in Sabbia Mettallica


Amadeo V12 and TISE All-Wheel Drive - A Powerful Combination.

The Cinquetorri shares its heart with the La Serenissima, the five-litre, turbocharged and direct-injected S050.653 Amadeo V12, producing 651 horsepower at 7800 RPM and 518 ft-lb of torque at 4100 RPM. The engine is coupled to an all-new 9-speed automatic transmission, with a variety of shift modes selected either automatically though the CAST selector, or manually by the driver. Coupled to Scagliati’s all-new Trazione Integrale Super-Elettronica (Super-Electronic All-Wheel Drive) or TISE for short, the Cinquetorri’s drivetrain automatically and seamlessly sends any amount of torque to either axle through electronically-controlled front, center and rear differentials, with the ability to vector torque laterally up to 75 percent at the front and 100 percent at the rear.


2019 Scagliati Cinquetorri in Bianco Fantasma

The CAST system has been extensively reworked in the Cinquetorri; in addition to the familiar Corsa, Attivo, Stradale and Tiempo modes, a variety of other modes aimed at off-road operation have been added, with modes for sand, snow, mud and grass added to the system, as well as a hill descent mode for extreme off-road operation.


2019 Cinquetorri LS in Como Mettallica


Flexible Interior Choices.

The Cinquetorri interior is a familiar place for any Scagliati customer, with the opulent seating area trimmed in the finest leathers and sustainable coverings, and a wide range of wood and alternative trim accents available. The base Cinquetorri has two rows of seats, for five in total, with heated and cooled seats for pilot, front and rear passengers, with integrated seat-back displays in the backs of the front seats. Separate climate control in the rear allows for rear passengers to enjoy comfort independent of the pilot and passenger, while variable-tint rear windows (NOTE: not available in all markets) help maintain the privacy of the Cinquetorri’s occupants. The Cinquetorri is available in a two-row, four seat configuration as well, with the rear passengers enjoying a truly decadent experience, with an optional beverage cooler between the two reclining seats. Also available is a seven-seat, three row version, the Cinquetorri LS, with seating for two more passengers in a stowable rear seating arrangement, complete with heated seats, an additional climate zone and full seatback displays for the third-row passengers.

Engine Specifications
Engine Type Scagliati Amadeo S050.653 V12
Description 60-degree V12, aluminium-silicon block and heads, forged crankshaft, rods and pistons
Valvetrain 4-valves per cylinder, variable valve lift and timing
Bore x Stroke 83.0mm x 77.1mm
Displacement 5000cc
Aspiration twin-turbocharged and intercooled, direct fuel injection
Compression Ratio 9.8:1
Output 651 horsepower @ 7800 RPM, 518 ft-lb @ 4100 RPM
Redline 8500 RPM

Model Specifications Cinquetorri Cinquetorri L Cinquetorri LS
Layout Front-engine, all-wheel drive SUV
Seating Five Four Seven
Chassis/Body Carbon-fiber monocoque, aluminium panels ----
Suspension double-wishbone front, multi-link rear
Driveline 9-speed automatic transmission, electronic front, centre and rear differentials
Brakes carbon-ceramic front and rear
Curb Weight 2380 kilograms 2285 kilograms 2584 kilograms
Weight Distribution 57.2%F/42.8%R 57.4%F/42.6%R 56.6%F/43.4%R
0-100 km/h 4.4s 4.4s 4.8s
100-0 Braking Distance 31.3 m 31.0 m 32.4m
Top Speed 320 km/h*
Fuel Economy 12.6 litres/100km 12.4 litres/100km 13.3 litres/100km
List Price $230,400 $259,600 $242,590

*Top speed is electronically limited


2017 LA Auto Show
#19

Power and Poise - The 2018 Scagliati La Serenissima Quattrocento.


2018 Scagliati La Serenissima Quattrocento in Rosso Veneto

Scagliati Prestazione Speciale is proud to present the La Serenissima Quattrocento, the last word in performance in the Scagliati lineup. The engineers and craftsmen of the Special Performance Division in Mirano spent countless hours refining and reworking the base La Serenissima T, already a very fast and powerful car in its own right, making countless aerodynamic refinements to boost the high-speed stability of the new car with one goal in mind - to create the fastest GT car in the world. The bodywork of the Quattrocento was changed, with new fenders front and rear to fit 305-section tires front and rear, specially developed in conjunction with CMW Aero and Fujisaki Tire, to cope with the extreme demands of a 2069-kilogram car capable of reaching speeds in excess of 400 kilometres per hour.



Scagliati La Serenissima Quattrocento Rear Aerodynamics


Scagliati La Serenissima Quattrocento Front Aerodynamics


Scagliati La Serenissima Quattrocento Body Changes

Pushing To The Limits Of Possibility.

To attain such speeds, the team took the Amadeo V12 engine to 5.4 litres of displacement, and fitted the engine with a stronger rotating assembly, better intake manifold and a pair of larger turbochargers. Running on 100RON fuel only, the reworked SP050.879T engine produces a staggering 922 horsepower and 635 foot-pounds of torque, making the Quattrocento the most powerful production Scagliati ever. Zero to one hundred kilometres per hour is accomplished in 3.8 seconds; two hundred approaches at 8.4 seconds and the Quattrocento sails past three hundred kilometres per hour in 18.8 seconds, all while returning 12.1 litres per hundred kilometres. The seven-speed dual-clutch transmission has been strengthened and reprogrammed for more aggressive shifting, and the CAST system has been completely reprogrammed, with traction and stability control cribbed directly from the PS Division’s motorsports activities, giving the Quattrocento unprecedented control and traction in all regimes.

On the 19th of November, 2017, a customer-specification La Serenissima Quattrocento attempted to set a world class speed record as part of final validation testing at the CMW Proving Grounds in Germany, setting an unofficial two-way speed record of 407.704 kilometres per hour through a flying kilometre, achieving the goal that the Prestazione Speciale team set for themselves when they began the project.

Engine Specifications
Engine Type Scagliati Amadeo SP050.879T V12
Description 60-degree V12, aluminium-silicon block and heads, forged crankshaft, rods and pistons
Valvetrain 4-valves per cylinder, variable valve lift and timing
Bore x Stroke 85.0mm x 79.3mm
Displacement 5398cc
Aspiration twin-turbocharged and intercooled, direct fuel injection
Compression Ratio 9.7:1
Output 922 horsepower @ 8700 RPM, 635 ft-lb @ 5200 RPM
Redline 9300 RPM

Model Specifications La Serenissima Quattrocento
Layout Front-engine, rear-wheel drive coupe
Seating Four
Chassis/Body Carbon-fiber monocoque, aluminium panels
Suspension double-wishbone front, multi-link rear
Driveline 7-speed double clutch transmission, electronic limited-slip differential
Brakes carbon-ceramic front and rear
Curb Weight 2069 kilograms
Weight Distribution 57.1%F/42.9%R
0-100 km/h 3.8s
100-0 Braking Distance 27.3m
Top Speed 408 km/h
Fuel Economy 12.1 litres/100km
List Price $294,600
Number to be Produced 100

2018 Goodwood Festival of Speed
#20

Scagliati History, Part 4 - 1957 300 Turismo and 300 Cannaregio.


1957 Scagliati 300 Turismo, in Grigio Ardesia

As part of our company’s 70th anniversary, the Scagliati Museum is proud to present the latest addition to our collection, the 1957 300 Turismo. Making its debut at the 1956 Geneva Auto Show, the 300 Turismo was the much-anticipated follow-on to the Serenissima family, the first and only model family that Scagliati had produced up until that time. Larger, more comfortable and easier to drive than its predecessor, the 300 Turismo featured steel monocoque chassis, the first Scagliati to use this construction method, and the hand-beaten aluminium body panels that had become the signature of Scagliati.


Larger fourteen-inch wire wheels allowed for larger drum brakes front and rear, while the venerable Scalzano two-valve, single-overhead cam V12 grew to 3600cc of displacement, thanks to forged internals and better production methods. Breathing through the ubiquitous six downdraft carburetors, the 300 Sei was good for 253 horsepower and 232 foot-pounds of torque, propelling the 1313-kilogram convertible to one hundred kilometres per hour in seven seconds flat, and on to a top speed of 231 kilometres per hour.



300 Cannaregio - Focused Motoring.




1957 Scagliati 300 Cannaregio, in Marrone Noce

Along with the 300 Turismo, a coupe variant also made its debut, the 300 Cannaregio. The Cannaregio ultimately lent its name to this body style of Scagliati, with its timeless good looks and stunning performance. While the 300 Turismo offered a more serene motoring experience for their owners, the Cannaregio was much more focused, with a much stiffer and more aggressive suspension than the Turismo, plus an aggressive weight-saving program to keep the Cannaregio’s weight within twenty-five kilograms of the outgoing 285 Veneto GTS. This meant that for a brief period, the 300 Cannaregio was the one of the fastest Scagliatis ever produced, even able to match pace with the “La Dominante” of 1954-55, and without any of the compromises a racing car makes to the comfort of the pilot, as Scagliati is known to call the drivers of their cars, or passsengers.


While the Serenissima family of the decade prior made their mark on the motoring world, it was the 300 Turismo and Cannaregio that truly propelled Scagliati to the forefront of the Italian motor industry, the success of this family (and later planned models) so great that Amadeo Scagliati had no choice but to abandon La Vecchia Officina - the old, drafty workshop where Scagliati built their cars in from 1947 to 1960, then on and off with various projects until 1976 and now serving as the location for the Scagliati Museum - for an all-new factory on Via Matteotti on the outskirts of Mirano.


Specifications

Engine Specs 300 Turismo 300 Cannaregio
Engine Scagliati Scalzano 300 Sei
Desciption 60-degree V12, cast-iron block and cylinder heads; cast pistons, rods and crankshaft
Valvetrain single overhead cam, 2-valves per cylinder
Displacement 3600 cubic centimetres
Aspriation six downdraft-style carburetors, single high-performance filter element
Compression Ratio 10.5:1
Output 253 horsepower @ 5900 RPM, 232 ft-lb @ 5600 RPM
Redline 6400 RPM

Chassis Specs 300 Turismo 300 Cannaregio
Layout front-engine, rear-wheel drive convertible front-engine, rear-wheel drive coupe
Seating driver + one passenger, luxury seating
Chassis/Body Steel monocoque, hand-formed aluminium body
Suspension double-wishbone front and rear
Driveline 4-speed manual gearbox, automatic locking differential
Brakes front and rear two-cylinder drum brakes, 275mm diameter
Curb Weight 1313 kg 1160 kg
Weight Distribution 57.7%F/42.3%R 57.4%F/42.6%R
0-100 km/h 7.0s 6.5s
Top Speed 231 km/h
100-0 Braking Distance 44.5 m 41.4 m
List Price, New $22100 $21320
Production Run 1957-1960 1957-1960
Examples Produced 511 467