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Your guilty car pleasure/confession


#82

I hate the R34 Skyline GT-R, and I love it the R33 GT-R.


#83

I really have a thing for soviet offroad and military trucks…

Such glorious machine. I have to have it :sunglasses:


#84

I love turning up at car shows in my Prius.


#85

Savage


#86

Hell yeah man. I can’t wait to take the Neon to some.


#87

The XV20 Toyota Camry is a damn fine looking car. Still not exciting but handsome and excellently proportioned.


#88

I actually liked the idea of the vw phaeton, although I’d like it more without the decorative vents. Apparently the maintenance costs are ridiculous though.

I want to buy a track car and disguise it as an embarrassing midlife crisis-mobile. Maybe rebadge a corvette zr1 to look like that entry level trim your uncle threw away his life savings for. Then I could show up to an event dressed like I got lost on my way to the country club…


#89

I have a proper hard on for shitboxes tuned to beat the finest supercars. Like when Civics smoke Lambos and Ferraris and the likes in highway pulls

Also unpopular confession but I mostly HATE 90s sports cars. So bland, inoffensive…they don’t tell me anything.


#90

My childhood has just been mindblown, never knew it was an actual car. Big Momma and Big Daddy til I die :raised_hands:


Oh right, guilty car pleasure/confessions: I think Ferraris look way better in silver than in red.

On the topic of Ferraris and confessions:
  • Ferrari have yet to make better looking cars than the F360 and the 575 Maranello
  • The 612 Scaglietti, whilst looking a bit like a whale at the front (albeti a very happy one), is actually a very pretty car

#91

In my opinion Pt Cruiser is actually cool


#92

Deep Blue or nothing


#93

I could rock a V6 XV20


#94

… You’re dead to me.

:stuck_out_tongue:


#95

Leave


#96

Eh. I was always more of a fan of the Plymouth Prowler.


#97

Yeah see to a point I’d agree with this, (almost) have a hankering for one of the GT Turbo ones.


#98

I thought of buying the GT model, but it chugs a lot of fuel and it isn’t exactly reliable according to what I’ve heard


#99

Most Chrysler vehicles are perfectly fine if you maintain them, don’t listen to the things you hear from Scotty Kilmer, but the 2.4 turbo is one I think that wasn’t so hot.


#100

lol


#101

I also have a soft spot for the 360 Modena and 575 Maranello, especially when fitted with the standard six-speed manual gearbox, which feels better matched to them than the optional F1 sequential gearbox. In addition, I share Vri’s preference for shades of deep metallic blue, such as Blu Tour De France.

Now for something older - and most definitely British:

I will also admit to liking the Jaguar XJS. Controversial looks and questionable reliability meant that it had a worse reputation at launch than it should have; however, when Tom Walkinshaw got his hands on it, Jaguar management quickly realized that it could be a successful touring car. It went on to win the European Touring Car Championship in 1984, and in the hands of John Goss and Armin Hahne, became the only V12-powered car ever to win the Bathurst 1000 the following year (as well as being the first Group A car to do so). But this was only the start of Walkinshaw’s ambitions: he later persuaded Jaguar to re-enter the World Sportscar Championship (eventually winning the 1988 24 Hours of Le Mans), before going on to found the Holden Racing Team (now Walkinshaw Andretti United) - and the rest is history.

Eventually Jaguar capitalized on its successful competition record with the XJR-S, which went on sale in 1988 and was offered with a 5.3-litre V12 developing well over 300 horsepower, later enlarged to 6.0 litres.

Here’s what a HE (High Efficiency) XJS V12 - which ironed out most of the earlier cars’ teething troubles - is like to drive:

And here’s the story behind the #33 TWR XJS which made history in 1985:

With such competition provenance, it’s no wonder the XJS remained in production for an incredible 20 years, until it was finally replaced by the XK8 in 1996. And with E-Type prices already well into the stratosphere, the XJS is finally receiving a deserved reappraisal from the collector car market.